Neurotensin receptors in the human amygdaloid complex. Topographical and quantitative autoradiographic study

Tibor Ágoston Lantos, Miklós Palkovits, William Rostène, Anne Bérod

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8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The distribution of high affinity 125I-neurotensin (NT) binding sites were investigated in the amygdaloid complex of adult humans by means of dry film and emulsion autoradiography. Autoradiograms were analysed quantitatively using [125I] standards and an image analyser system, and data obtained were converted to nCi of ligand bound per mg tissue. High densities of 125I-NT binding sites were found in the following amygdaloid structures: the dorsal part of the accessory basal nucleus, the medial part of the cortical nucleus, the lateral subdivision of the central nucleus, the paralaminar nucleus, the amygdalohippocampal transition area and the rostral portions of the anterior amygdaloid area. The ventral part of the accessory basal nucleus, the intercalated cell groups and the remaining parts of the anterior amygdaloid area showed moderate density of NT binding sites, while the medial, basal and lateral amygdaloid nuclei, the lateral part of the cortical nucleus, the medial subdivision of the central nucleus, as well as the corticoamygdaloid transition area exhibited low densities of 125I-NT binding sites. At microscopic level, silver grains appeared more or less evenly distributed over both neuronal perikarya and the surrounding neuropil. In comparison to NT-immunoreactivity, NT receptors showed mismatching distribution throughout most parts of the amygdala, with the exception of the lateral subdivision of the central nucleus, where NT-immunoreactive perikarya and nerve fibers as well as 125I-NT binding sites were found in high density.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)209-217
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of chemical neuroanatomy
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1996

Keywords

  • Human amygdala
  • Neurotensin binding sites
  • Receptor autoradiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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