Neuronal code of spatial visual information in the caudate nucleus

P. Gombköto, A. Rokszin, A. Berényi, G. Braunitzer, G. Utassy, G. Benedek, A. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Earlier reports described huge overlapping visual receptive fields and the absence of retinotopic organization in the dorsolateral, caudal part of the caudate nucleus. In the present study we suggest a possible alternative mechanism for the coding of spatial visual information. Extracellular microelectrode recordings were carried out in halothane-anesthetized, immobilized, artificially ventilated cats. In order to investigate the responsiveness of the single neurons to visual information arriving from different sites of the receptive field, we divided the visual fields to 20 parts of equal size and stimulated the individual parts one-by-one. We found that each single visual caudate nucleus (CN) neuron can carry information about stimulus locations throughout the whole physically approachable visual field of the investigated eye. A large majority (85%) of these neurons exhibited significantly different responses to stimuli appearing in different regions of their huge receptive field. Thus these neurons appear to have the ability to provide information on the site of the stimulus via their discharge rate. The huge receptive fields in combination with the spatial selectivity suggest that these caudate nucleus neurons may serve as panoramic localizers. On the population level, the sites of maximal responsiveness of the visual neurons are distributed over the whole extent of the receptive fields. We argue that groups of these panoramic localizer neurons with different locations of maximal stimulus preference should have the ability to accurately code the locations of visual stimuli. We propose this distributed population code of visual information as an alternative information processing mechanism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)225-231
Number of pages7
JournalNeuroscience
Volume182
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 19 2011

Fingerprint

Caudate Nucleus
Neurons
Visual Fields
Aptitude
Microelectrodes
Halothane
Automatic Data Processing
Population
Cats

Keywords

  • Basal ganglia
  • Cat
  • Panoramic localizer
  • Spatial selectivity
  • Striatum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Neuronal code of spatial visual information in the caudate nucleus. / Gombköto, P.; Rokszin, A.; Berényi, A.; Braunitzer, G.; Utassy, G.; Benedek, G.; Nagy, A.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 182, 19.05.2011, p. 225-231.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gombköto P, Rokszin A, Berényi A, Braunitzer G, Utassy G, Benedek G et al. Neuronal code of spatial visual information in the caudate nucleus. Neuroscience. 2011 May 19;182:225-231. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2011.02.048
Gombköto, P. ; Rokszin, A. ; Berényi, A. ; Braunitzer, G. ; Utassy, G. ; Benedek, G. ; Nagy, A. / Neuronal code of spatial visual information in the caudate nucleus. In: Neuroscience. 2011 ; Vol. 182. pp. 225-231.
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