Neurochemical evidence of dopamine release by lateral olivocochlear efferents and its presynaptic modulation in guinea-pig cochlea

A. Gáborján, B. Lendvai, E. Vízi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, using an in vitro superfusion technique for the first time, we provide direct neurochemical evidence of the transmitter role of dopamine at the level of lateral olivocochlear efferent fibres of the guinea- pig cochlea. Our results revealed that nerve terminals are able to take up and release dopamine upon axonal stimulation. Since dopamine is thought to protect the afferent nerve fibres from damage due to acoustic trauma or ischaemia, enhancement of the release of dopamine, a potential therapeutic site of these injuries, was investigated. Positive modulation of dopamine release has been shown by a D1 dopamine receptor agonist, an antagonist and piribedil. Furthermore, negative feedback on the stimulation-evoked release of dopamine via D2 dopamine receptors has been excluded. Electrical stimulation of the cochlear tissue produced a significant and reproducible release of [3H]dopamine, which could be blocked by tetrodotoxin (1 μM) and cadmium (100 μM), proving that axonal activity releases dopamine and its dependence on Ca2+ influx verifies its neuronal origin. Nomifensine, a high-affinity dopamine uptake blocker, prevented the tissue from taking up [3H]dopamine from the bathing solution, also indicating the neural origin of dopamine released in response to stimulation. SKF-38393 (a selective D1 agonist) increased both the resting and electrically evoked release of dopamine. Piribedil (a D3/D2/D1 agonist), a drug under investigation, known to prevent acoustic trauma or ischaemia-induced hearing loss, had a similar and concentration-dependent increasing effect on both resting and evoked release of dopamine. The effect of both drugs on stimulation-evoked release could be prevented by SKF-83566 (a selective D1 antagonist). However, SKF-83566 alone enhanced the resting and axonal conduction- associated release of dopamine. D2 agonists and antagonists failed to modulate the release of dopamine, indicating the lack of negative feedback modulation of dopamine release. Our results suggest that the release of dopamine was subjected to modulation by a D1 receptor agonist and an antagonist. In addition, it is concluded that D2 receptors are not involved in the modulation of dopamine release. This observation may have clinical relevance in the prevention or therapy of particular types of hearing loss, because enhanced dopaminergic input into the primary auditory neuron may inhibit the (over)excitation of this neuron by glutamatergic input from inner hair cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-138
Number of pages8
JournalNeuroscience
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Cochlea
Dopamine
Guinea Pigs
Piribedil
Noise-Induced Hearing Loss
Dopamine Antagonists
Hearing Loss
Inner Auditory Hair Cells
Ischemia
Nomifensine
2,3,4,5-Tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-1H-3-benzazepine
Neurons
Dopamine D2 Receptors
Dopamine Agonists
Tetrodotoxin
Cadmium
Nerve Fibers

Keywords

  • D and D agonists and antagonists
  • Dopamine release
  • Guinea-pig cochlea
  • In vitro superfusion
  • Lateral olivocochlear efferents
  • Piribedil

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Neurochemical evidence of dopamine release by lateral olivocochlear efferents and its presynaptic modulation in guinea-pig cochlea. / Gáborján, A.; Lendvai, B.; Vízi, E.

In: Neuroscience, Vol. 90, No. 1, 1999, p. 131-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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