Neurobiological approach to computing devices

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

According to the old metaphor of classical cybernetics the brain can be considered as a computer. Newer theoretical endeavours reverse the question and ask: what could neurobiology offer to engineers of near-future generation computer systems? Three not completely disjoint abstract functions of the nervous system, namely pattern formation, pattern recognition and action, can be treated in a unified conceptual framework. Storage and retrieval mechanisms of information are connected to fault-tolerant, adaptive parallel structures. "Learning" and "plastic behaviour" are interpreted in terms of the theory of non-linear dynamic systems. As neural development and plasticity can be approached by deterministic models superimposed by random influence, noise might also have a positive role to play during the operation of technical computing devices. Molecular computation is discussed in relation to eventual hardware realization of "neurobiology-based" computers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-133
Number of pages9
JournalBioSystems
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1988

Fingerprint

Neurobiology
neurophysiology
Molecular Computers
Cybernetics
Equipment and Supplies
Metaphor
Neuronal Plasticity
Nonlinear Dynamics
computer system
Computing
Information Storage and Retrieval
Social Responsibility
Computer Systems
pattern recognition
Neurology
nervous system
conceptual framework
Computer hardware
Nervous System
hardware

Keywords

  • Architecture of brain
  • Learning
  • Molecular computation
  • Neurobotics
  • Non-linear dynamics
  • Pattern recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Biotechnology
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Neurobiological approach to computing devices. / Érdi, P.

In: BioSystems, Vol. 21, No. 2, 1988, p. 125-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Érdi, P. / Neurobiological approach to computing devices. In: BioSystems. 1988 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 125-133.
@article{166e344b41b648328bf855372a575cdf,
title = "Neurobiological approach to computing devices",
abstract = "According to the old metaphor of classical cybernetics the brain can be considered as a computer. Newer theoretical endeavours reverse the question and ask: what could neurobiology offer to engineers of near-future generation computer systems? Three not completely disjoint abstract functions of the nervous system, namely pattern formation, pattern recognition and action, can be treated in a unified conceptual framework. Storage and retrieval mechanisms of information are connected to fault-tolerant, adaptive parallel structures. {"}Learning{"} and {"}plastic behaviour{"} are interpreted in terms of the theory of non-linear dynamic systems. As neural development and plasticity can be approached by deterministic models superimposed by random influence, noise might also have a positive role to play during the operation of technical computing devices. Molecular computation is discussed in relation to eventual hardware realization of {"}neurobiology-based{"} computers.",
keywords = "Architecture of brain, Learning, Molecular computation, Neurobotics, Non-linear dynamics, Pattern recognition",
author = "P. {\'E}rdi",
year = "1988",
doi = "10.1016/0303-2647(88)90005-6",
language = "English",
volume = "21",
pages = "125--133",
journal = "BioSystems",
issn = "0303-2647",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neurobiological approach to computing devices

AU - Érdi, P.

PY - 1988

Y1 - 1988

N2 - According to the old metaphor of classical cybernetics the brain can be considered as a computer. Newer theoretical endeavours reverse the question and ask: what could neurobiology offer to engineers of near-future generation computer systems? Three not completely disjoint abstract functions of the nervous system, namely pattern formation, pattern recognition and action, can be treated in a unified conceptual framework. Storage and retrieval mechanisms of information are connected to fault-tolerant, adaptive parallel structures. "Learning" and "plastic behaviour" are interpreted in terms of the theory of non-linear dynamic systems. As neural development and plasticity can be approached by deterministic models superimposed by random influence, noise might also have a positive role to play during the operation of technical computing devices. Molecular computation is discussed in relation to eventual hardware realization of "neurobiology-based" computers.

AB - According to the old metaphor of classical cybernetics the brain can be considered as a computer. Newer theoretical endeavours reverse the question and ask: what could neurobiology offer to engineers of near-future generation computer systems? Three not completely disjoint abstract functions of the nervous system, namely pattern formation, pattern recognition and action, can be treated in a unified conceptual framework. Storage and retrieval mechanisms of information are connected to fault-tolerant, adaptive parallel structures. "Learning" and "plastic behaviour" are interpreted in terms of the theory of non-linear dynamic systems. As neural development and plasticity can be approached by deterministic models superimposed by random influence, noise might also have a positive role to play during the operation of technical computing devices. Molecular computation is discussed in relation to eventual hardware realization of "neurobiology-based" computers.

KW - Architecture of brain

KW - Learning

KW - Molecular computation

KW - Neurobotics

KW - Non-linear dynamics

KW - Pattern recognition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0023818395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0023818395&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0303-2647(88)90005-6

DO - 10.1016/0303-2647(88)90005-6

M3 - Article

VL - 21

SP - 125

EP - 133

JO - BioSystems

JF - BioSystems

SN - 0303-2647

IS - 2

ER -