Neural mechanisms for lexical processing in dogs

A. Andics, A. Gábor, M. Gácsi, T. Faragó, D. Szabó, A. Miklósi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During speech processing, human listeners can separately analyze lexical and intonational cues to arrive at a unified representation of communicative content. The evolution of this capacity can be best investigated by comparative studies. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we explored whether and how dog brains segregate and integrate lexical and intonational information. We found a left-hemisphere bias for processing meaningful words, independently of intonation; a right auditory brain region for distinguishing intonationally marked and unmarked words; and increased activity in primary reward regions only when both lexical and intonational information were consistent with praise. Neural mechanisms to separately analyze and integrate word meaning and intonation in dogs suggest that this capacity can evolve in the absence of language.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1030-1032
Number of pages3
JournalScience
Volume353
Issue number6303
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2 2016

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Dogs
Word Processing
Brain
Reward
Cues
Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • General

Cite this

Andics, A., Gábor, A., Gácsi, M., Faragó, T., Szabó, D., & Miklósi, A. (2016). Neural mechanisms for lexical processing in dogs. Science, 353(6303), 1030-1032. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf3777

Neural mechanisms for lexical processing in dogs. / Andics, A.; Gábor, A.; Gácsi, M.; Faragó, T.; Szabó, D.; Miklósi, A.

In: Science, Vol. 353, No. 6303, 02.09.2016, p. 1030-1032.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Andics, A, Gábor, A, Gácsi, M, Faragó, T, Szabó, D & Miklósi, A 2016, 'Neural mechanisms for lexical processing in dogs', Science, vol. 353, no. 6303, pp. 1030-1032. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaf3777
Andics, A. ; Gábor, A. ; Gácsi, M. ; Faragó, T. ; Szabó, D. ; Miklósi, A. / Neural mechanisms for lexical processing in dogs. In: Science. 2016 ; Vol. 353, No. 6303. pp. 1030-1032.
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