Nest predation in European reedbeds: Different losses in edges but similar losses in interiors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Higher nest predation at habitat edges is a major problem for conservation biology. We studied nest predation using artificial nests resembling great reed warblers' nests at edges and interiors of reedbeds in four large wetlands in Europe: Lake Hornborga (Sweden), Lake Neusiedl (Austria), Lake Velence (Central-Hungary) and Kis-Balaton marshland (West-Hungary). Nest losses showed great local and temporal variation, and in general there was larger nest predation at the edges than in the interior reedbeds. Predation rates of artificial nests along different reedbed edges showed great variation. In contrast, predation rates of interiors were more similar across all experiments, with less variation. This may indicate the existence of a habitat-specific predation rate with less variation in interiors of large habitats, while edges are more exposed to the influences of other factors, which resulted in higher variation of predation rates among study sites. Therefore, reedbed conservation should prefer large stands if considering only passerine nest predation, because (1) nest survival seems to be higher in interior than at edges, and (2) because interiors are less variable, i.e. more stable than edges. The designation of reedbeds cannot rely on reedbed edges, where predation can change due to factors not related to the reed habitat at all.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-292
Number of pages8
JournalFolia Zoologica
Volume54
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

reedbed
nest predation
nests
predation
artificial nest
nest
habitat
lake
edge effects
Hungary
lakes
passerine
loss
temporal variation
wetland
habitats
Austria
rate
Sweden
wetlands

Keywords

  • Artificial nests
  • Edge effect
  • Great reed warbler
  • Habitat fragmentation
  • Variability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Nest predation in European reedbeds : Different losses in edges but similar losses in interiors. / Báldi, A.; Batáry, P.

In: Folia Zoologica, Vol. 54, No. 3, 2005, p. 285-292.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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