Nerve stretch injury induced pain pattern and changes in sensory ganglia in a clinically relevant model of limb-lengthening in rabbits

K. Pap, Berta, G. Szóke, M. Dunay, T. Németh, K. Hornok, L. Marosfói, M. Réthelyi, M. Kozsurek, Z. Puskár

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We used a model of tibial lengthening in rabbits to study the postoperative pain pattern during limb-lengthening and morphological changes in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), including alteration of substance P (SP) expression. Four groups of animals (naïve; OG: osteotomized only group; SDG/FDG: slow/fast distraction groups, with 1 mm/3 mm lengthening a day, respectively) were used. Signs of increasing postoperative pain were detected until the 10th postoperative day in OG/SDG/FDG, then they decreased in OG but remained higher in SDG/FDG until the distraction finished, suggesting that the pain response is based mainly on surgical trauma until the 10th day, while the lengthening extended its duration and increased its intensity. The only morphological change observed in the DRGs was the presence of large vacuoles in some large neurons of OG/SDG/FDG. Cell size analysis of the S1 DRGs showed no cell loss in any of the three groups; a significant increase in the number of SP-positive large DRG cells in the OG; and a significant decrease in the number of SP-immunoreactive small DRG neurons in the SDG/FDG. Faster and larger distraction resulted in more severe signs of pain sensation, and further reduced the number of SP-positive small cells, compared to slow distraction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)571-581
Number of pages11
JournalPhysiological Research
Volume64
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Sensory Ganglia
Substance P
Spinal Ganglia
Extremities
Rabbits
Pain
Diagnosis-Related Groups
Wounds and Injuries
Postoperative Pain
Neurons
Hypesthesia
Vacuoles
Cell Size

Keywords

  • DRG
  • Limb-lengthening
  • Neuropathic pain
  • Postoperative pain
  • Rabbit
  • Substance P

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology

Cite this

Nerve stretch injury induced pain pattern and changes in sensory ganglia in a clinically relevant model of limb-lengthening in rabbits. / Pap, K.; Berta; Szóke, G.; Dunay, M.; Németh, T.; Hornok, K.; Marosfói, L.; Réthelyi, M.; Kozsurek, M.; Puskár, Z.

In: Physiological Research, Vol. 64, No. 4, 2015, p. 571-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pap, K, Berta, Szóke, G, Dunay, M, Németh, T, Hornok, K, Marosfói, L, Réthelyi, M, Kozsurek, M & Puskár, Z 2015, 'Nerve stretch injury induced pain pattern and changes in sensory ganglia in a clinically relevant model of limb-lengthening in rabbits', Physiological Research, vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 571-581.
Pap, K. ; Berta ; Szóke, G. ; Dunay, M. ; Németh, T. ; Hornok, K. ; Marosfói, L. ; Réthelyi, M. ; Kozsurek, M. ; Puskár, Z. / Nerve stretch injury induced pain pattern and changes in sensory ganglia in a clinically relevant model of limb-lengthening in rabbits. In: Physiological Research. 2015 ; Vol. 64, No. 4. pp. 571-581.
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