Nature of wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight and the role of deoxynivalenol for breeding

Á Mesterházy, T. Bartók, C. G. Mirocha, R. Komoróczy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

242 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty (1990-93) and 25 (1994-96) wheat genotypes with different degrees of resistance and origins were tested with seven and eight isolates, respectively, of Fusarium graminearum and four Fusarium culmorum isolates of diverse origin in Europe. Infection severity depended largely on the genotypes and the isolates used. Head blight values, yield response and kernel infection values revealed close but varying relationships with deoxynivalenol (DON) content. This variability is explained by the presence of tolerance mechanisms which affect the relationship between Fusarium head blight severity and yield response. Kernel infection resistance accounted for decreasing Fusarium head blight values. Genotypes were found with lower infection severity and higher DON contamination and vice versa. Evidently, the cultivar has a significant influence on DON production in the infected tissue, i.e, highly susceptible genotypes may have moderate or low accumulation of DON. However, in the most resistant genotypes showing no infection to any of the isolates or only sporadic symptom development, no or very low accumulation of DON was detected. Resistant genotypes gave a stable reaction with b-values close to zero for all traits tested. Susceptible genotypes were unstable under different epidemic conditions and their stability was different for the traits investigated. Therefore, the mean of b-values is suggested to better describe the stability of the wheat genotypes. Significant positive relationships were found between aggressiveness of the isolates and their production of DON in the infected grain. The correlation improved significantly for the nivalenol-producing isolate (F89.4 from France) when the sum of DON and nivalenol contents were considered. This indicates that the total trichothecene toxin-producing capacity of the isolates may be a decisive component of pathogenicity. Since the tests included isolates from different European countries the results provide further proof that no host specificity exists within these pathogens in Europe. This was also valid for kernel infection, yield response and DON accumulation. Therefore, the nature of resistance is horizontal. The results also support the view that there is no difference between the resistance of the host plant to F. graminearum and to F. culmorum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-110
Number of pages14
JournalPlant Breeding
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1999

Fingerprint

Fusarium head blight
Fusarium
deoxynivalenol
Triticum
Breeding
Genotype
wheat
genotype
breeding
Infection
infection
nivalenol
Fusarium culmorum
Fusarium graminearum
seeds
head blight
Trichothecenes
trichothecenes
Host Specificity
host specificity

Keywords

  • Aggressiveness deoxynivalenol
  • Fusarium culmorum
  • Fusarium graminearum
  • Head blight disease
  • Host resistance
  • Nivalenol
  • Pathogenicity
  • Tolerance
  • Toxin production
  • Triticum aestivum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science
  • Biotechnology

Cite this

Nature of wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight and the role of deoxynivalenol for breeding. / Mesterházy, Á; Bartók, T.; Mirocha, C. G.; Komoróczy, R.

In: Plant Breeding, Vol. 118, No. 2, 05.1999, p. 97-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mesterházy, Á ; Bartók, T. ; Mirocha, C. G. ; Komoróczy, R. / Nature of wheat resistance to Fusarium head blight and the role of deoxynivalenol for breeding. In: Plant Breeding. 1999 ; Vol. 118, No. 2. pp. 97-110.
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