Natural Substances from Higher Plants as Potential Anti-MRSA Agents

G. Horváth, Ágnes Farkas, Nóra Papp, Tímea Bencsik, Kamilla Ács, Kinga Gyergyák, Béla Kocsis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Antibiotics used for prevention and treatment in agriculture, veterinary, and human medicine can cause selective pressure leading to the spread of resistant mutants. Since development of resistance is becoming more common, there is a greater need for alternative treatments. However, there has been a continued decline in the number of newly approved drugs. Antibiotic resistance, therefore, poses a significant problem. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a bacterium responsible for several difficult-to-treat infections in humans and responsible for nosocomial infections as well. This bacterium has developed resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. MRSA is especially troublesome in hospitals, where patients with open wounds and weakened immune systems are at greater risk of infection than the general public. The treatment of MRSA infection is presently problematic, because only few antibiotics (vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, tigecycline, etc.) are effective against this bacterium. Moreover, several newly discovered strains of MRSA show antibiotic resistance even to vancomycin and teicoplanin. The number of studies focusing on secondary metabolites produced by plants, as potential antibiotic agents against human microorganisms, has recently increased. This review focuses on the application of natural substances of higher plant origin (eg, honey, essential oils, polyphenols) as anti-MRSA agents and evaluates some of the recently published in vitro and in vivo studies and data obtained from clinical trials. Our review includes the advantages and disadvantages of the bioassays used most frequently for determination of anti-MRSA activity, and demonstrates the potential medicinal value of secondary plant metabolites in the case of MRSA infection. The chemical structure of the most important compounds is highlighted, together with the mode of action of some of these substances.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationStudies in Natural Products Chemistry, 2016
PublisherElsevier
Pages63-110
Number of pages48
Volume47
ISBN (Print)9780444636034
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Publication series

NameStudies in Natural Products Chemistry
Volume47
ISSN (Print)15725995

Fingerprint

Methicillin
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Teicoplanin
Bacteria
Linezolid
Vancomycin
Microbial Drug Resistance
Metabolites
Infection
Lactams
Veterinary Medicine
Honey
Bioassay
Immune system
Polyphenols
Volatile Oils
Cross Infection
Agriculture
Biological Assay

Keywords

  • antibacterial activity
  • clinical study
  • essential oil
  • honey
  • in vitro
  • in vivo
  • mode of action
  • MRSA
  • polyphenols
  • secondary plant metabolites

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Drug Discovery

Cite this

Horváth, G., Farkas, Á., Papp, N., Bencsik, T., Ács, K., Gyergyák, K., & Kocsis, B. (2016). Natural Substances from Higher Plants as Potential Anti-MRSA Agents. In Studies in Natural Products Chemistry, 2016 (Vol. 47, pp. 63-110). (Studies in Natural Products Chemistry; Vol. 47). Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63603-4.00003-6

Natural Substances from Higher Plants as Potential Anti-MRSA Agents. / Horváth, G.; Farkas, Ágnes; Papp, Nóra; Bencsik, Tímea; Ács, Kamilla; Gyergyák, Kinga; Kocsis, Béla.

Studies in Natural Products Chemistry, 2016. Vol. 47 Elsevier, 2016. p. 63-110 (Studies in Natural Products Chemistry; Vol. 47).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Horváth, G, Farkas, Á, Papp, N, Bencsik, T, Ács, K, Gyergyák, K & Kocsis, B 2016, Natural Substances from Higher Plants as Potential Anti-MRSA Agents. in Studies in Natural Products Chemistry, 2016. vol. 47, Studies in Natural Products Chemistry, vol. 47, Elsevier, pp. 63-110. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63603-4.00003-6
Horváth G, Farkas Á, Papp N, Bencsik T, Ács K, Gyergyák K et al. Natural Substances from Higher Plants as Potential Anti-MRSA Agents. In Studies in Natural Products Chemistry, 2016. Vol. 47. Elsevier. 2016. p. 63-110. (Studies in Natural Products Chemistry). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-444-63603-4.00003-6
Horváth, G. ; Farkas, Ágnes ; Papp, Nóra ; Bencsik, Tímea ; Ács, Kamilla ; Gyergyák, Kinga ; Kocsis, Béla. / Natural Substances from Higher Plants as Potential Anti-MRSA Agents. Studies in Natural Products Chemistry, 2016. Vol. 47 Elsevier, 2016. pp. 63-110 (Studies in Natural Products Chemistry).
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