Myxozoans exploiting homeotherms

Sascha L. Hallett, Stephen D. Atkinson, Jerri L. Bartholomew, C. Székely

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Discoveries published in 2007 and 2008 expanded the known host range of myxozoans beyond poikilotherms to include mammals and birds. Here we review records of myxozoans from small terrestrial mammals, waterfowl and those associated with humans, and augment them with data from our ongoing studies. True myxosporean infections—those with active parasite development and sporogenesis—have been recorded for Soricimyxum spp. in central European shrews and Myxidium spp. in North American waterfowl. In all cases, bile ducts within the liver were the nidal tissue and complete life cycles are unknown. Incidental myxosporean infections—the presence of myxospores without parasite development—have been observed in humans, usually in association with the ingestion of infected fish. Clinical presentations of these cases range from no disease (e.g. Henneguya spp.), allergic responses (Kudoa sp.) or acute gastroenteritis (Kudoa septempunctata). Phylogenetically, myxosporean parasites of homeotherms cluster closely with Myxidium and Cystodiscus species known to infect other terrestrial vertebrates (reptiles and amphibians), which suggests a single evolutionary expansion from an aquatic Myxidium-clade ancestor to semi-aquatic and terrestrial hosts and environments. Given the diversity of potential mammalian and avian hosts, we expect additional myxosporean parasites to be discovered with further scrutiny of these homeotherms, especially in sparsely surveyed regions including Africa and South America.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMyxozoan Evolution, Ecology and Development
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages125-135
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9783319147536, 9783319147529
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Myxidium
parasite
Parasites
Kudoa
parasites
Mammals
waterfowl
mammal
Henneguya
mammals
Shrews
gastroenteritis
Reptiles
bile ducts
South America
Host Specificity
shrews
host range
Gastroenteritis
Birds

Keywords

  • Homeotherms
  • Humans
  • Kudoa
  • Myxidium
  • Small mammals
  • Soricimyxum
  • Waterfowl

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Hallett, S. L., Atkinson, S. D., Bartholomew, J. L., & Székely, C. (2015). Myxozoans exploiting homeotherms. In Myxozoan Evolution, Ecology and Development (pp. 125-135). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-14753-6_7

Myxozoans exploiting homeotherms. / Hallett, Sascha L.; Atkinson, Stephen D.; Bartholomew, Jerri L.; Székely, C.

Myxozoan Evolution, Ecology and Development. Springer International Publishing, 2015. p. 125-135.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Hallett, SL, Atkinson, SD, Bartholomew, JL & Székely, C 2015, Myxozoans exploiting homeotherms. in Myxozoan Evolution, Ecology and Development. Springer International Publishing, pp. 125-135. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-14753-6_7
Hallett SL, Atkinson SD, Bartholomew JL, Székely C. Myxozoans exploiting homeotherms. In Myxozoan Evolution, Ecology and Development. Springer International Publishing. 2015. p. 125-135 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-14753-6_7
Hallett, Sascha L. ; Atkinson, Stephen D. ; Bartholomew, Jerri L. ; Székely, C. / Myxozoans exploiting homeotherms. Myxozoan Evolution, Ecology and Development. Springer International Publishing, 2015. pp. 125-135
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