Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts

Walter P. Pfliegler, T. Pusztahelyi, I. Pócsi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The application of yeasts has great potential in reducing the economic damage caused by toxigenic fungi in the agriculture. Some yeasts may act as biocontrol agents inhibiting the growth of filamentous fungi. These species may also gain importance in the preservation of agricultural products and in the reduction of their mycotoxin contamination, yet the extent of mycotoxin production in the presence of biocontrol agents is relatively less understood. The application of yeasts in various technological processes may have a direct inhibitory effect on the toxin production of certain molds, which is independent of their growth suppressing effect. Furthermore, several yeast species are capable of accumulating mycotoxins from agricultural products, thereby effectively decontaminating them. Probiotic yeasts or products containing yeast cell wall are also applied to counteract mycotoxicosis in livestock. Several yeast strains are also able to degrade toxins to less-toxic or even non-toxic substances. This intensively researched field would greatly benefit from a deeper knowledge on the genetic and molecular basis of toxin degradation. Moreover, yeasts and their biotechnologically important enzymes may exhibit sensitivity to certain mycotoxins, thereby mounting a considerable problem for the biotechnological industry. It is noted that yeasts are generally regarded as safe; however, there are reports of toxin degrading species that may cause human fungal infections. The aspects of yeast-mycotoxin relations with a brief consideration of strain improvement strategies and genetic modification for improved detoxifying properties and/or mycotoxin resistance are reviewed here.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)805-818
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Basic Microbiology
Volume55
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

Decontamination
Mycotoxins
Yeasts
Fungi
Mycotoxicosis
Mycoses
Poisons
Probiotics
Livestock
Growth
Agriculture
Cell Wall
Molecular Biology
Industry
Economics

Keywords

  • Biocontrol
  • Biodegradation
  • Decontamination
  • Mycotoxin
  • Yeast

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Mycotoxins - prevention and decontamination by yeasts. / Pfliegler, Walter P.; Pusztahelyi, T.; Pócsi, I.

In: Journal of Basic Microbiology, Vol. 55, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 805-818.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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