Mycorrhizae-rhizosphere determinants of plant communities

What can we learn from the tropics?

Ingrid Kottke, G. Kovács

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Plant communities are characterized by species composition and abundances. Local occurrence of communities was explained by assuming the abiotic factors and plant-plant interactions as the most important drivers (Ellenberg 1996). Recently, phylogeny and paleobiogeography of plants became more relevant to understand, for example, disparity of species richness among tropical, temperate, and boreal biomes (Fine et al. 2008). Biotic interactions came into interest as shaping tropical plant communities (Burslem et al. 2005). Here, we focus on soil fungi that mutually associate with fine roots of more than 90% of land plants by forming mycorrhizae (Smith and Read 2008). By the nonrandom, phylogenetic conservative associations of mycobionts and plants established in coevolution since appearance of first land plants, local presence or absence of the distinct mycobionts appeared as an important determinant upon establishment of land plants and their communities (Smith and Read 2008).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPlant Roots
Subtitle of host publicationThe Hidden Half, Fourth Edition
PublisherCRC Press
Pages703-716
Number of pages14
ISBN (Electronic)9781439846490
ISBN (Print)9781439846483
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2013

Fingerprint

Mycorrhizae
Tropics
Rhizosphere
Fungi
mycorrhizae
plant communities
tropics
rhizosphere
embryophytes
Embryophyta
Soils
Chemical analysis
species diversity
soil fungi
phylogeny
coevolution
Phylogeny
environmental factors
Ecosystem
ecosystems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

Kottke, I., & Kovács, G. (2013). Mycorrhizae-rhizosphere determinants of plant communities: What can we learn from the tropics? In Plant Roots: The Hidden Half, Fourth Edition (pp. 703-716). CRC Press.

Mycorrhizae-rhizosphere determinants of plant communities : What can we learn from the tropics? / Kottke, Ingrid; Kovács, G.

Plant Roots: The Hidden Half, Fourth Edition. CRC Press, 2013. p. 703-716.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Kottke, I & Kovács, G 2013, Mycorrhizae-rhizosphere determinants of plant communities: What can we learn from the tropics? in Plant Roots: The Hidden Half, Fourth Edition. CRC Press, pp. 703-716.
Kottke I, Kovács G. Mycorrhizae-rhizosphere determinants of plant communities: What can we learn from the tropics? In Plant Roots: The Hidden Half, Fourth Edition. CRC Press. 2013. p. 703-716
Kottke, Ingrid ; Kovács, G. / Mycorrhizae-rhizosphere determinants of plant communities : What can we learn from the tropics?. Plant Roots: The Hidden Half, Fourth Edition. CRC Press, 2013. pp. 703-716
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