Multigene prognostic tests in breast cancer: Past, present, future

B. Györffy, Christos Hatzis, Tara Sanft, Erin Hofstatter, Bilge Aktas, Lajos Pusztai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is growing consensus that multigene prognostic tests provide useful complementary information to tumor size and grade in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancers. The tests primarily rely on quantification of ER and proliferation-related genes and combine these into multivariate prediction models. Since ER-negative cancers tend to have higher proliferation rates, the prognostic value of current multigene tests in these cancers is limited. First-generation prognostic signatures (Oncotype DX, MammaPrint, Genomic Grade Index) are substantially more accurate to predict recurrence within the first 5 years than in later years. This has become a limitation with the availability of effective extended adjuvant endocrine therapies. Newer tests (Prosigna, EndoPredict, Breast Cancer Index) appear to possess better prognostic value for late recurrences while also remaining predictive of early relapse. Some clinical prediction problems are more difficult to solve than others: there are no clinically useful prognostic signatures for ER-negative cancers, and drug-specific treatment response predictors also remain elusive. Emerging areas of research involve the development of immune gene signatures that carry modest but significant prognostic value independent of proliferation and ER status and represent candidate predictive markers for immune-targeted therapies. Overall metrics of tumor heterogeneity and genome integrity (for example, homologue recombination deficiency score) are emerging as potential new predictive markers for platinum agents. The recent expansion of high-throughput technology platforms including low-cost sequencing of circulating and tumor-derived DNA and RNA and rapid reliable quantification of microRNA offers new opportunities to build extended prediction models across multiplatform data.

Original languageEnglish
Article number11
JournalBreast Cancer Research
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 27 2015

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Estrogen Receptors
Breast Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Recurrence
Platinum
MicroRNAs
Genetic Recombination
Genes
Biomarkers
Genome
RNA
Technology
Costs and Cost Analysis
DNA
Therapeutics
Research
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Multigene prognostic tests in breast cancer : Past, present, future. / Györffy, B.; Hatzis, Christos; Sanft, Tara; Hofstatter, Erin; Aktas, Bilge; Pusztai, Lajos.

In: Breast Cancer Research, Vol. 17, No. 1, 11, 27.01.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Györffy, B. ; Hatzis, Christos ; Sanft, Tara ; Hofstatter, Erin ; Aktas, Bilge ; Pusztai, Lajos. / Multigene prognostic tests in breast cancer : Past, present, future. In: Breast Cancer Research. 2015 ; Vol. 17, No. 1.
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