Motion and interaction of aspirin crystals at aqueous-air interfaces

T. Bánsági, Magdalena M. Wrobel, Stephen K. Scott, Annette F. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Small-molecule amphiphiles such as aspirin have unique properties arising from a combination of an aromatic hydrophobic part and a hydrophilic part. We show that crystals of aspirin are capable of generating convective flows at the air-aqueous interface from both Marangoni effects (through weak surface activity) and capillarity (surface deformations). The flow-driven motion of millimeter-sized crystals was found to depend on the presence of other ions in solution as well as the distance and orientation of the crystals. The interactions lead to the formation of groups of two or more crystals that also underwent motion. The convective flows created by small amphiphile crystals might be exploited in the dynamic self-organization of particles at interfaces.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13572-13577
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume117
Issue number43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 31 2013

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Aspirin
Crystals
air
Air
Amphiphiles
convective flow
crystals
interactions
Capillarity
Crystal orientation
Ions
Molecules
molecules
ions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

Cite this

Motion and interaction of aspirin crystals at aqueous-air interfaces. / Bánsági, T.; Wrobel, Magdalena M.; Scott, Stephen K.; Taylor, Annette F.

In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, Vol. 117, No. 43, 31.10.2013, p. 13572-13577.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bánsági, T. ; Wrobel, Magdalena M. ; Scott, Stephen K. ; Taylor, Annette F. / Motion and interaction of aspirin crystals at aqueous-air interfaces. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 2013 ; Vol. 117, No. 43. pp. 13572-13577.
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