Most calretinin-containing amacrine cells in the rabbit retina co-localize glycine

R. Gábriel, B. Völgyi, Edit Pollák

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Calretinin-containing retinal amacrine cells are heterogeneous with regard to their neurochemical properties. In the rabbit retina, about 90% of them contain glycine, as evidenced in the present study by double-label immunocytochemistry. In a previous report, we showed that a small population of amacrine cells contains both γ-aminobutyric acid and calretinin. In this study, we further identified this cell population by means of known secondary markers. However, none of the markers we tested (choline acetyltransferase, serotonin accumulation, NADPH-diaphorase, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide) co-localized with calretinin. A small population (1%) of the cells in the ganglion cell layer contains both calretinin and glycine. Since calretinin-positive cells in the ganglion cell layer have been identified as ganglion cells based on soma size and presence of calretinin-positive axons in the optic nerve fiber layer, this population may represent a class of ganglion cell which contains glycine. Our results, together with those of other studies, suggest that calretinin is not a general marker of any of the well-known amacrine cell types in the mammalian retina. Rather, calretinin, just as other calcium-binding proteins, is distributed in a species-specific manner. At the same time it appears that, as shown for horizontal cells, one or more of the major buffer-type calcium-binding proteins of the EF-hand family is present in most of the retinal amacrine cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)983-990
Number of pages8
JournalVisual Neuroscience
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1999

Fingerprint

Calbindin 2
Amacrine Cells
Glycine
Retina
Rabbits
Ganglia
Calcium-Binding Proteins
Population
EF Hand Motifs
Aminobutyrates
NADPH Dehydrogenase
Choline O-Acetyltransferase
Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide
Carisoprodol
Optic Nerve
Nerve Fibers
Axons
Serotonin
Buffers
Immunohistochemistry

Keywords

  • γ-aminobutyric acid
  • Calretinin
  • Co-localization
  • Glycine
  • Immunocytochemistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Most calretinin-containing amacrine cells in the rabbit retina co-localize glycine. / Gábriel, R.; Völgyi, B.; Pollák, Edit.

In: Visual Neuroscience, Vol. 16, No. 6, 11.1999, p. 983-990.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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