Molecular response of nasal mucosa to therapeutic exposure to broad-band ultraviolet radiation

David Mitchell, Lakshmi Paniker, Guillermo Sanchez, Zsolt Bella, Edina Garaczi, M. Széll, Qutayba Hamid, L. Kemény, A. Koreck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) phototherapy is a promising new treatment for inflammatory airway diseases. However, the potential carcinogenic risks associated with this treatment are not well understood. UV-specific DNA photoproducts were used as biomarkers to address this issue. Radioimmunoassay was used to quantify cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts in DNA purified from two milieus: nasal mucosa samples from subjects exposed to intranasal phototherapy and human airway (EpiAirway™) and human skin (EpiDerm™) tissue models. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect CPD formation and persistence in human nasal biopsies and human tissue models. In subjects exposed to broadband ultraviolet radiation, DNA damage frequencies were determined prior to as well as immediately after treatment and at increasing times post-treatment. We observed significant levels of DNA damage immediately after treatment and efficient removal of the damage within a few days. No residual damage was observed in human subjects exposed to multiple UVB treatments several weeks after the last treatment. To better understand the molecular response of the nasal epithelium to DNA damage, parallel experiments were conducted in EpiAirway and EpiDerm model systems. Repair rates in these two tissues were very similar and comparable to that observed in human skin. The data suggest that the UV-induced DNA damage response of respiratory epithelia is very similar to that of the human epidermis and that nasal mucosa is able to efficiently repair UVB induced DNA damage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)313-322
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Volume14
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

Fingerprint

Nasal Mucosa
Radiation
DNA Damage
Pyrimidine Dimers
Phototherapy
Therapeutics
Respiratory Mucosa
Skin
DNA
Nose
Epidermis
Radioimmunoassay
Biomarkers
Immunohistochemistry
Biopsy

Keywords

  • Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer
  • Nucleotide excision repair
  • Pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct
  • Reconstructed 3-D human epidermis
  • Reconstructed 3-D human respiratory epithelium
  • Rhinophototherapy
  • Ultraviolet radiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Molecular response of nasal mucosa to therapeutic exposure to broad-band ultraviolet radiation. / Mitchell, David; Paniker, Lakshmi; Sanchez, Guillermo; Bella, Zsolt; Garaczi, Edina; Széll, M.; Hamid, Qutayba; Kemény, L.; Koreck, A.

In: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Vol. 14, No. 1-2, 01.2010, p. 313-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitchell, David ; Paniker, Lakshmi ; Sanchez, Guillermo ; Bella, Zsolt ; Garaczi, Edina ; Széll, M. ; Hamid, Qutayba ; Kemény, L. ; Koreck, A. / Molecular response of nasal mucosa to therapeutic exposure to broad-band ultraviolet radiation. In: Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine. 2010 ; Vol. 14, No. 1-2. pp. 313-322.
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