Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the maple powdery mildew (Sawadaea, Erysiphaceae) inferred from nuclear rDNA sequences

Simon Hirose, Seinosuke Tanda, L. Kiss, Banga Grigaliunaite, Maria Havrylenko, Susumu Takamatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the phylogenetic relationships and evolution of the powdery mildew genus Sawadaea (Ascomycota: Erysiphaceae), obligate parasitic fungi of maples, we performed molecular phylogenetic analyses based on 47 ITS and ten 28S rDNA sequences. Seven major clades of Sawadaea, each represented by powdery mildew specimens collected from a single or a small number of closely related sections of Acer (maples), were identified in this study, suggesting that a close evolutionary relationship exists between Acer (host) and Sawadaea (parasite). A 6-11-base insertion/deletion was found in the ITS1 region of Sawadaea, and the presence or absence of the indel was consistent within the respective clades. Because the outgroup genera Podosphaera and Cystotheca have no deletions in these sites, deletion of the sequences may have occurred during the divergence of the respective clades of Sawadaea. The seven clades of Sawadaea were divided into two geographical groups, viz. an East Asian and a global group, based on the countries of collection. Calculation of the evolutionary timing of Sawadaea using molecular clocks showed that the divergence of different species of Acer occurred many millions of years before the radiation of Sawadaea. Thus, the close evolutionary relationship between Sawadaea and Acer found in this study might not be due to a true coevolutionary process. Powdery mildew fungi belonging to Sawadaea may have jumped onto Acer spp. long after the radiation of the major sections of these trees, and then expanded their host ranges according to the phylogeny and geographical distribution of Acer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)912-922
Number of pages11
JournalMycological Research
Volume109
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2005

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Erysiphaceae
Acer
Molecular Evolution
Phylogeny
Ribosomal DNA
powdery mildew
phylogeny
divergence
fungus
phylogenetics
host range
geographical distribution
parasite
Fungi
Radiation
Podosphaera
Ascomycota
fungi
radiation
Sequence Deletion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the maple powdery mildew (Sawadaea, Erysiphaceae) inferred from nuclear rDNA sequences. / Hirose, Simon; Tanda, Seinosuke; Kiss, L.; Grigaliunaite, Banga; Havrylenko, Maria; Takamatsu, Susumu.

In: Mycological Research, Vol. 109, No. 8, 08.2005, p. 912-922.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hirose, Simon ; Tanda, Seinosuke ; Kiss, L. ; Grigaliunaite, Banga ; Havrylenko, Maria ; Takamatsu, Susumu. / Molecular phylogeny and evolution of the maple powdery mildew (Sawadaea, Erysiphaceae) inferred from nuclear rDNA sequences. In: Mycological Research. 2005 ; Vol. 109, No. 8. pp. 912-922.
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