Molecular mechanisms of taste recognition: Considerations about the role of saliva

Tibor Károly Fábián, Anita Beck, P. Fejérdy, P. Hermann, G. Fábián

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The gustatory system plays a critical role in determining food preferences and food intake, in addition to nutritive, energy and electrolyte balance. Fine tuning of the gustatory system is also crucial in this respect. The exact mechanisms that fine tune taste sensitivity are as of yet poorly defined, but it is clear that various effects of saliva on taste recognition are also involved. Specifically those metabolic polypeptides present in the saliva that were classically considered to be gut and appetite hormones (i.e., leptin, ghrelin, insulin, neuropeptide Y, peptide YY) were considered to play a pivotal role. Besides these, data clearly indicate the major role of several other salivary proteins, such as salivary carbonic anhydrase (gustin), proline-rich proteins, cystatins, alpha-amylases, histatins, salivary albumin and mucins. Other proteins like glucagon-like peptide-1, salivary immunoglobulin-A, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein, salivary lactoperoxidase, salivary prolactin-inducible protein and salivary molecular chaperone HSP70/HSPAs were also expected to play an important role. Furthermore, factors including salivary flow rate, buffer capacity and ionic composition of saliva should also be considered. In this paper, the current state of research related to the above and the overall emerging field of taste-related salivary research alongside basic principles of taste perception is reviewed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5945-5974
Number of pages30
JournalInternational Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume16
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 13 2015

Fingerprint

Salivary Proteins and Peptides
saliva
taste
Saliva
Histatins
food intake
Cystatins
Peptide YY
Lactoperoxidase
proteins
Proteins
Ghrelin
Molecular Chaperones
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Carbonic Anhydrases
alpha-Amylases
Neuropeptide Y
Mucins
Leptin
Proline

Keywords

  • Perception
  • Receptor
  • Saliva
  • Salivary
  • Taste

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Inorganic Chemistry
  • Catalysis
  • Molecular Biology
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Molecular mechanisms of taste recognition : Considerations about the role of saliva. / Fábián, Tibor Károly; Beck, Anita; Fejérdy, P.; Hermann, P.; Fábián, G.

In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol. 16, No. 3, 13.03.2015, p. 5945-5974.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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