Molecular Detection of Circulating Cancer Cells: Role in Diagnosis, Prognosis and Follow-Up of Colon Cancer Patients

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Abstract

Background: The circulating tumor cells of solid tumors, especially in colorectal cancer has been of great interest in medical research in the last and new century. Methods: A literature review of recent data for the preparation of a proposal for clinical applications. Results: Starting with the detection of circulating cancer cells in histological sections, lymph nodes, bone marrow and peripheral blood have recently become the primary samples for these investigations. Following microscopic morphology, new methods were and are being developed continuously including rare cell enrichment and detection techniques like fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and methylated DNA PCR. The sensitivity of these assays reaches down to the concentration of 1 tumor cell/ml blood. A lot of different epithelial markers were targeted with these techniques e.g. cytokeratins, EGFR, CEA, and EMA. Clinically, circulating tumor cells were found as independent prognostic factors in lymph nodes and bone marrow. In blood, their presence appears to be an early marker for recurrence and relapse. The change in their quantitative number is supposed to reflect the chemotherapeutic sensitivity and metastatic growth activity of the tumor. Conclusions: The detection of circulating tumor cells in bone marrow and lymph nodes is of clinical significance. Their presence in peripheral blood and therapeutic applications need further clarification.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-325
Number of pages6
JournalDigestive Diseases
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Circulating Neoplastic Cells
Colonic Neoplasms
Lymph Nodes
Bone Marrow
Neoplasms
Recurrence
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Keratins
Fluorescence Microscopy
Biomedical Research
Colorectal Neoplasms
Blood Cells
Flow Cytometry
DNA
Growth
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Chemosensitivity
  • Circulating cancer cells
  • Circulating tumor cells
  • Colon cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Molecular biology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

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title = "Molecular Detection of Circulating Cancer Cells: Role in Diagnosis, Prognosis and Follow-Up of Colon Cancer Patients",
abstract = "Background: The circulating tumor cells of solid tumors, especially in colorectal cancer has been of great interest in medical research in the last and new century. Methods: A literature review of recent data for the preparation of a proposal for clinical applications. Results: Starting with the detection of circulating cancer cells in histological sections, lymph nodes, bone marrow and peripheral blood have recently become the primary samples for these investigations. Following microscopic morphology, new methods were and are being developed continuously including rare cell enrichment and detection techniques like fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and methylated DNA PCR. The sensitivity of these assays reaches down to the concentration of 1 tumor cell/ml blood. A lot of different epithelial markers were targeted with these techniques e.g. cytokeratins, EGFR, CEA, and EMA. Clinically, circulating tumor cells were found as independent prognostic factors in lymph nodes and bone marrow. In blood, their presence appears to be an early marker for recurrence and relapse. The change in their quantitative number is supposed to reflect the chemotherapeutic sensitivity and metastatic growth activity of the tumor. Conclusions: The detection of circulating tumor cells in bone marrow and lymph nodes is of clinical significance. Their presence in peripheral blood and therapeutic applications need further clarification.",
keywords = "Chemosensitivity, Circulating cancer cells, Circulating tumor cells, Colon cancer, Colorectal cancer, Molecular biology",
author = "B. Moln{\'a}r and F. S{\'i}pos and O. Galamb and Z. Tulassay",
year = "2003",
doi = "10.1159/000075355",
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T2 - Role in Diagnosis, Prognosis and Follow-Up of Colon Cancer Patients

AU - Molnár, B.

AU - Sípos, F.

AU - Galamb, O.

AU - Tulassay, Z.

PY - 2003

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N2 - Background: The circulating tumor cells of solid tumors, especially in colorectal cancer has been of great interest in medical research in the last and new century. Methods: A literature review of recent data for the preparation of a proposal for clinical applications. Results: Starting with the detection of circulating cancer cells in histological sections, lymph nodes, bone marrow and peripheral blood have recently become the primary samples for these investigations. Following microscopic morphology, new methods were and are being developed continuously including rare cell enrichment and detection techniques like fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and methylated DNA PCR. The sensitivity of these assays reaches down to the concentration of 1 tumor cell/ml blood. A lot of different epithelial markers were targeted with these techniques e.g. cytokeratins, EGFR, CEA, and EMA. Clinically, circulating tumor cells were found as independent prognostic factors in lymph nodes and bone marrow. In blood, their presence appears to be an early marker for recurrence and relapse. The change in their quantitative number is supposed to reflect the chemotherapeutic sensitivity and metastatic growth activity of the tumor. Conclusions: The detection of circulating tumor cells in bone marrow and lymph nodes is of clinical significance. Their presence in peripheral blood and therapeutic applications need further clarification.

AB - Background: The circulating tumor cells of solid tumors, especially in colorectal cancer has been of great interest in medical research in the last and new century. Methods: A literature review of recent data for the preparation of a proposal for clinical applications. Results: Starting with the detection of circulating cancer cells in histological sections, lymph nodes, bone marrow and peripheral blood have recently become the primary samples for these investigations. Following microscopic morphology, new methods were and are being developed continuously including rare cell enrichment and detection techniques like fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and methylated DNA PCR. The sensitivity of these assays reaches down to the concentration of 1 tumor cell/ml blood. A lot of different epithelial markers were targeted with these techniques e.g. cytokeratins, EGFR, CEA, and EMA. Clinically, circulating tumor cells were found as independent prognostic factors in lymph nodes and bone marrow. In blood, their presence appears to be an early marker for recurrence and relapse. The change in their quantitative number is supposed to reflect the chemotherapeutic sensitivity and metastatic growth activity of the tumor. Conclusions: The detection of circulating tumor cells in bone marrow and lymph nodes is of clinical significance. Their presence in peripheral blood and therapeutic applications need further clarification.

KW - Chemosensitivity

KW - Circulating cancer cells

KW - Circulating tumor cells

KW - Colon cancer

KW - Colorectal cancer

KW - Molecular biology

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