Molecular architecture of the cannabinoid signaling system in the core of the nucleus accumbens.

Ferenc Mátyás, Masahiko Watanabe, Ken Mackie, I. Katona, T. Freund

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several abused drugs are known to alter glutamatergic signaling in reward pathways of the brain, and these plastic changes may contribute to the establishment of addiction-related behaviour. Glutamatergic synapses of the prefrontal cortical projections to the nucleus accumbens (nAcb)--which are suggested to be under endocannabinoid (eCB) control - play a central role in the addiction process. The most abundant eCB in the brain is 2-arachi-donoyl-glycerol (2-AG). It is synthesized by diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DGL-alpha), and exerts its action via type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1). However, the precise localization of DGL-alpha and CB1 - i.e. the sites of synthesis and action of 2AG - is still unknown. At the light microscopic level, immunocytochemistry revealed a granular pattern of DGL-alpha distribution in the core of the nAcb. Electron microscopic analysis confirmed that these granules corresponded to the heads of dendritic spines. On the other hand, presynaptic axon terminals forming excitatory synapses on these spineheads were found to express CB1 receptors. Our results demonstrate that the molecular constituents for a retrograde endocannabinoid control of glutamatergic transmission are available in the core of the nAcb, and their relative subcellular location is consistent with a role of 2-AG in addiction-related plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses in this reward area.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-191
Number of pages5
JournalIdeggyógyászati szemle
Volume60
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - Mar 30 2007

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Endocannabinoids
Cannabinoids
Lipoprotein Lipase
Nucleus Accumbens
Synapses
Cannabinoid Receptor CB1
Presynaptic Terminals
Reward
Glycerol
Dendritic Spines
Brain
Immunohistochemistry
Electrons
Light
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Arachis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Molecular architecture of the cannabinoid signaling system in the core of the nucleus accumbens. / Mátyás, Ferenc; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mackie, Ken; Katona, I.; Freund, T.

In: Ideggyógyászati szemle, Vol. 60, No. 3-4, 30.03.2007, p. 187-191.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mátyás, Ferenc ; Watanabe, Masahiko ; Mackie, Ken ; Katona, I. ; Freund, T. / Molecular architecture of the cannabinoid signaling system in the core of the nucleus accumbens. In: Ideggyógyászati szemle. 2007 ; Vol. 60, No. 3-4. pp. 187-191.
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