Molecular and pathogenic characterization of salmonella enterica serovar bovismorbificans strains of animal, environmental, food, and human origin in Hungary

Noémi Nógrády, Ariel Imre, Ágnes Kostyák, A. Tóth, B. Nagy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In this study, we characterized 110 strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Bovismorbificans contaminating environment, animals, food of animal origin, and human, to assess their significance along the food chain in Hungary. Additionally, five strains from Germany were tested for comparative purposes. Characterization involved antibiotic susceptibility testing, class 1 integron detection by polymerase chain reaction, plasmid profiling, virulotyping (using virulence gene-specific polymerase chain reactions), and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Pathogenic potential of selected strains was tested in orally infected 1-day-old specific pathogen-free chicks. Eighty-two percent of the strains were susceptible to the 16 antibiotics tested, and none of them had class 1 integron. A multidrug-resistant human isolate harbored a bla SHV5-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene, first reported in this serotype. All the strains possessed avrA, ssaQ, mgtC, spi4, and sopB genes indicating the presence of Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1-5, respectively, missed the phage-related genes sopE and gipA, but retained the phage-related gene sodC1. An ∼90kb large plasmid was characteristic to 80% of the strains, all of which carried the spvC gene. In vivo colonization testing of four selected strains in 1-day-old chicks resulted in significantly reduced liver and spleen colonization ability as compared with the Salmonella Enteritidis control strain, whereas their caecal colonization ability differed less from that of Salmonella Enteritidis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis data revealed the dominance of two pulsotypes (C2 and C5) without any specific temporal, geographical, and/or source-related linkages. The results show that Salmonella Bovismorbificans studied here are less invasive than Salmonella Enteritidis, but they may colonize and persist in several animal species and successfully contaminate meat products of different animal origin in Hungary.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507-513
Number of pages7
JournalFoodborne Pathogens and Disease
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Salmonella enterica
Hungary
serotypes
Food
Salmonella enteritidis
Integrons
Genes
animals
Salmonella Enteritidis
Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis
Salmonella
Bacteriophages
genes
Plasmids
pulsed-field gel electrophoresis
Salmonella Bovismorbificans
bacteriophages
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Genomic Islands
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology

Cite this

Molecular and pathogenic characterization of salmonella enterica serovar bovismorbificans strains of animal, environmental, food, and human origin in Hungary. / Nógrády, Noémi; Imre, Ariel; Kostyák, Ágnes; Tóth, A.; Nagy, B.

In: Foodborne Pathogens and Disease, Vol. 7, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 507-513.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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