Modelling a complex environmental system: The lake Balaton study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A systems approach is introduced into eutrophication modelling and is illustrated by the example of Lake Balaton, Hungary, one of the world's largest shallow lakes. One of the major features of the problem is its complexity. Many interrelated processes should be considered in the lake and in the corresponding watershed, both on the level of scientific understanding and policy making. The other essential feature is the presence of various kinds of uncertainties. The approach developed is off-line in character, which avoids the direct coupling of the detailed descriptions of all the subprocesses. The procedure starts with the decomposition of the entire model into smaller, tractable units, forming a hierarchial system. This step is followed by aggregation, the aim of which is to preserve and integrate only essentials in the higher stratum. The various levels involve the modelling of biological phenomena, the sediment-water interaction, hydrodynamic and transport processes and the nutrient loads, with the corresponding calibration and validation steps. The approach accounts also for the influence of natural and man-made influences, as well as for the propagation of uncertainties. The procedure can lead to a realistic but yet simple model on the higher level of the hierarchy, where an optimization problem should be solved (e.g., how the maximum water quality improvement can be achieved under given budget constraints). The various steps of the study are illustrated by examples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)481-502
Number of pages22
JournalMathematical Modelling
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1982

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Lakes
Eutrophication
Uncertainty
Budget Constraint
Hydrodynamic Interaction
Quality Improvement
Transport Processes
Water Quality
Sediment
Nutrients
Modeling
Biological Phenomena
Aggregation
Calibration
Hungary
Policy Making
Integrate
Entire
Budgets
Hydrodynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Modelling a complex environmental system : The lake Balaton study. / Somlyódy, L.

In: Mathematical Modelling, Vol. 3, No. 5, 1982, p. 481-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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