Modeled areal evaporation trends over the conterminous United States

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term (1961-1990) areal evapotranspiration (AE) has been modeled with the help of 210 stations of the Solar and Meteorological Surface Observation Network within the conterminous United States. Modeled AE, averaged over all stations, has shown an overall increase of about 2-3% in the period 1961-1990, both on an annual basis and over the warm season (May-September). The rate of increase has differed among three geographic regions: The eastern, central, and western United States, with the largest modeled increase found in the east, followed by the central part of the United States. In the western part of the continent, modeled AE has, in fact, stayed constant. Of these trends, only the ones over the eastern part of the conterminous United States are statistically significant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)196-200
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering
Volume127
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2001

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Evapotranspiration
evapotranspiration
evaporation
Evaporation
Midwestern United States
Eastern United States
Western United States
warm season
Observation
trend
station

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Modeled areal evaporation trends over the conterminous United States. / Szilagyi, J.

In: Journal of Irrigation and Drainage Engineering, Vol. 127, No. 4, 07.2001, p. 196-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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