Minor and repetitive head injury

A. Büki, Noemi Kovacs, Endre Czeiter, Kara Schmid, Rachel P. Berger, Firas Kobeissy, Domenico Italiano, Ronald L. Hayes, Frank C. Tortella, E. Mezősi, Attila Schwarcz, Arnold Toth, Orsolya Nemes, Stefania Mondello

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in the young, active population and expected to be the third leading cause of death in the whole world until 2020. The disease is frequently referred to as the silent epidemic, and many authors highlight the “unmet medical need” associated with TBI. The term traumatically evoked brain injury covers a heterogeneous group ranging from mild/minor/minimal to severe/non-salvageable damages. Severe TBI has long been recognized to be a major socioeconomical health-care issue as saving young lives and sometimes entirely restituting health with a timely intervention can indeed be extremely cost efficient. Recently it has been recognized that mild or minor TBI should be considered similarly important because of the magnitude of the patient population affected. Other reasons behind this recognition are the association of mild head injury with transient cognitive disturbances as well as long-term sequelae primarily linked to repeat (sport-related) injuries. The incidence of TBI in developed countries can be as high as 2-300/100,000 inhabitants; however, if we consider the injury pyramid, it turns out that severe and moderate TBI represents only 25-30% of all cases, while the overwhelming majority of TBI cases consists of mild head injury. On top of that, or at the base of the pyramid, are the cases that never show up at the ER - the unreported injuries. Special attention is turned to mild TBI as in recent military conflicts it is recog-nized as “signature injury.” This chapter aims to summarize the most important features of mild and repetitive traumatic brain injury providing definitions, stratifications, and triage options while also focusing on contemporary knowledge gathered by imaging and bio-marker research. Mild traumatic brain injury is an enigmatic lesion; the classification, significance, and its consequences are all far less defined and explored than in more severe forms of brain injury. Understanding the pathobiology and pathomechanisms may aid a more targeted approach in triage as well as selection of cases with possible late complications while also identifying the target patient population where preventive measures and therapeutic tools should be applied in an attempt to avoid secondary brain injury and late complications.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery
PublisherSpringer International Publishing
Pages147-192
Number of pages46
Volume42
ISBN (Print)9783319090665, 9783319090658
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Craniocerebral Trauma
Brain Concussion
Brain Injuries
Triage
Cause of Death
Wounds and Injuries
Athletic Injuries
Health Services Needs and Demand
Traumatic Brain Injury
Developed Countries
Population
Delivery of Health Care
Costs and Cost Analysis
Incidence
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Endocrine consequences
  • Imaging
  • Mild
  • Repetitive
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Büki, A., Kovacs, N., Czeiter, E., Schmid, K., Berger, R. P., Kobeissy, F., ... Mondello, S. (2015). Minor and repetitive head injury. In Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery (Vol. 42, pp. 147-192). Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-09066-5_8

Minor and repetitive head injury. / Büki, A.; Kovacs, Noemi; Czeiter, Endre; Schmid, Kara; Berger, Rachel P.; Kobeissy, Firas; Italiano, Domenico; Hayes, Ronald L.; Tortella, Frank C.; Mezősi, E.; Schwarcz, Attila; Toth, Arnold; Nemes, Orsolya; Mondello, Stefania.

Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery. Vol. 42 Springer International Publishing, 2015. p. 147-192.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Büki, A, Kovacs, N, Czeiter, E, Schmid, K, Berger, RP, Kobeissy, F, Italiano, D, Hayes, RL, Tortella, FC, Mezősi, E, Schwarcz, A, Toth, A, Nemes, O & Mondello, S 2015, Minor and repetitive head injury. in Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery. vol. 42, Springer International Publishing, pp. 147-192. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-09066-5_8
Büki A, Kovacs N, Czeiter E, Schmid K, Berger RP, Kobeissy F et al. Minor and repetitive head injury. In Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery. Vol. 42. Springer International Publishing. 2015. p. 147-192 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-09066-5_8
Büki, A. ; Kovacs, Noemi ; Czeiter, Endre ; Schmid, Kara ; Berger, Rachel P. ; Kobeissy, Firas ; Italiano, Domenico ; Hayes, Ronald L. ; Tortella, Frank C. ; Mezősi, E. ; Schwarcz, Attila ; Toth, Arnold ; Nemes, Orsolya ; Mondello, Stefania. / Minor and repetitive head injury. Advances and Technical Standards in Neurosurgery. Vol. 42 Springer International Publishing, 2015. pp. 147-192
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