Minireview: Endoplasmic reticulum stress: Control in protein, lipid, and signal homeostasis

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28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a regulatory mechanism that allows cells to adapt to a series of metabolic, redox, and other environmental changes. The role of ER stress was first identified in the maintenance of proteostasis. It has since been shown that ER stress is also critical to the regulation of lipid homeostasis, membrane turnover, and autophagy. ER stress initiates an intrinsic signaling network, the unfolded protein response, one component of the multifold and complex cellular signaling process system, which leads to major changes in the profiles of transcription factors. The unfolded protein response affects several other signaling routes through direct connections and also by indirect means. It directly influences hormone formation and life/death decisions at a cellular level; this relationship also involves connections to nutrient and environmental sensing-biotransformation processes. In conclusion, ER stress represents an integrated complex organelle response that makes an essential contribution to the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)384-393
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular Endocrinology
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress
Homeostasis
Lipids
Unfolded Protein Response
Proteins
Maintenance
Autophagy
Membrane Lipids
Biotransformation
Organelles
Oxidation-Reduction
Transcription Factors
Hormones
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology

Cite this

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abstract = "Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a regulatory mechanism that allows cells to adapt to a series of metabolic, redox, and other environmental changes. The role of ER stress was first identified in the maintenance of proteostasis. It has since been shown that ER stress is also critical to the regulation of lipid homeostasis, membrane turnover, and autophagy. ER stress initiates an intrinsic signaling network, the unfolded protein response, one component of the multifold and complex cellular signaling process system, which leads to major changes in the profiles of transcription factors. The unfolded protein response affects several other signaling routes through direct connections and also by indirect means. It directly influences hormone formation and life/death decisions at a cellular level; this relationship also involves connections to nutrient and environmental sensing-biotransformation processes. In conclusion, ER stress represents an integrated complex organelle response that makes an essential contribution to the maintenance of intracellular homeostasis.",
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