Mineral metabolism in European children living with a renal transplant: A European society for paediatric nephrology/European renal association–european dialysis and transplant association registry study

Marjolein Bonthuis, Marco Busutti, Karlijn J. van Stralen, Kitty J. Jager, Sergey Baiko, Sevcan Bakkaloğlu, Nina Battelino, Maria Gaydarova, Bruno Gianoglio, Paloma Parvex, Clara Gomes, James G. Heaf, Ludmila Podracka, Dafina Kuzmanovska, Maria S. Molchanova, Tatiana E. Pankratenko, Fotios Papachristou, G. Reusz, Maria Josè Sanahuja, Rukshana ShroffJaap W. Groothoff, Franz Schaefer, Enrico Verrina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objectives Data on mineral metabolism in pediatric renal transplant recipients largely arise from small single-center studies. In adult patients, abnormal mineral levels are related to a higher risk of graft failure. This study used data from the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association– European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry to study the prevalence and potential determinants of mineral abnormalities, as well as the predictive value of a disturbed mineral level on graft survival in a large cohort of European pediatric renal transplant recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 1237 children (0–17 years) from 10 European countries, who had serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone measurements from 2000 onward. Abnormalities of mineral metabolism were defined according to European guidelines on prevention and treatment of renal osteodystrophy in children on chronic renal failure. Results Abnormal serum phosphorus levels were observed in 25% (14% hypophosphatemia and 11% hyperphosphatemia), altered serum calcium in 30% (19% hypocalcemia, 11% hypercalcemia), and hyperparathyroidism in 41% of the patients. A longer time since transplantation was associated with a lower risk of having mineral levels above target range. Serum phosphorus levels were inversely associated with eGFR, and levels above the recommended targets were associated with a higher risk of graft failure independently of eGFR. Conclusions Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are common after pediatric renal transplantation in Europe and are associated with graft dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)767-775
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Nephrology
Minerals
Registries
Renal Dialysis
Pediatrics
Transplants
Kidney
Phosphorus
Serum
Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder
Calcium
Hyperphosphatemia
Hypophosphatemia
Hypocalcemia
Hyperparathyroidism
Hypercalcemia
Graft Survival
Parathyroid Hormone
Kidney Transplantation
Chronic Kidney Failure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology
  • Transplantation
  • Epidemiology
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Mineral metabolism in European children living with a renal transplant : A European society for paediatric nephrology/European renal association–european dialysis and transplant association registry study. / Bonthuis, Marjolein; Busutti, Marco; van Stralen, Karlijn J.; Jager, Kitty J.; Baiko, Sergey; Bakkaloğlu, Sevcan; Battelino, Nina; Gaydarova, Maria; Gianoglio, Bruno; Parvex, Paloma; Gomes, Clara; Heaf, James G.; Podracka, Ludmila; Kuzmanovska, Dafina; Molchanova, Maria S.; Pankratenko, Tatiana E.; Papachristou, Fotios; Reusz, G.; Sanahuja, Maria Josè; Shroff, Rukshana; Groothoff, Jaap W.; Schaefer, Franz; Verrina, Enrico.

In: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Vol. 10, No. 5, 01.01.2015, p. 767-775.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bonthuis, M, Busutti, M, van Stralen, KJ, Jager, KJ, Baiko, S, Bakkaloğlu, S, Battelino, N, Gaydarova, M, Gianoglio, B, Parvex, P, Gomes, C, Heaf, JG, Podracka, L, Kuzmanovska, D, Molchanova, MS, Pankratenko, TE, Papachristou, F, Reusz, G, Sanahuja, MJ, Shroff, R, Groothoff, JW, Schaefer, F & Verrina, E 2015, 'Mineral metabolism in European children living with a renal transplant: A European society for paediatric nephrology/European renal association–european dialysis and transplant association registry study', Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, vol. 10, no. 5, pp. 767-775. https://doi.org/10.2215/CJN.06200614
Bonthuis, Marjolein ; Busutti, Marco ; van Stralen, Karlijn J. ; Jager, Kitty J. ; Baiko, Sergey ; Bakkaloğlu, Sevcan ; Battelino, Nina ; Gaydarova, Maria ; Gianoglio, Bruno ; Parvex, Paloma ; Gomes, Clara ; Heaf, James G. ; Podracka, Ludmila ; Kuzmanovska, Dafina ; Molchanova, Maria S. ; Pankratenko, Tatiana E. ; Papachristou, Fotios ; Reusz, G. ; Sanahuja, Maria Josè ; Shroff, Rukshana ; Groothoff, Jaap W. ; Schaefer, Franz ; Verrina, Enrico. / Mineral metabolism in European children living with a renal transplant : A European society for paediatric nephrology/European renal association–european dialysis and transplant association registry study. In: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. 2015 ; Vol. 10, No. 5. pp. 767-775.
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abstract = "Background and objectives Data on mineral metabolism in pediatric renal transplant recipients largely arise from small single-center studies. In adult patients, abnormal mineral levels are related to a higher risk of graft failure. This study used data from the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association– European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry to study the prevalence and potential determinants of mineral abnormalities, as well as the predictive value of a disturbed mineral level on graft survival in a large cohort of European pediatric renal transplant recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 1237 children (0–17 years) from 10 European countries, who had serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone measurements from 2000 onward. Abnormalities of mineral metabolism were defined according to European guidelines on prevention and treatment of renal osteodystrophy in children on chronic renal failure. Results Abnormal serum phosphorus levels were observed in 25{\%} (14{\%} hypophosphatemia and 11{\%} hyperphosphatemia), altered serum calcium in 30{\%} (19{\%} hypocalcemia, 11{\%} hypercalcemia), and hyperparathyroidism in 41{\%} of the patients. A longer time since transplantation was associated with a lower risk of having mineral levels above target range. Serum phosphorus levels were inversely associated with eGFR, and levels above the recommended targets were associated with a higher risk of graft failure independently of eGFR. Conclusions Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are common after pediatric renal transplantation in Europe and are associated with graft dysfunction.",
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T1 - Mineral metabolism in European children living with a renal transplant

T2 - A European society for paediatric nephrology/European renal association–european dialysis and transplant association registry study

AU - Bonthuis, Marjolein

AU - Busutti, Marco

AU - van Stralen, Karlijn J.

AU - Jager, Kitty J.

AU - Baiko, Sergey

AU - Bakkaloğlu, Sevcan

AU - Battelino, Nina

AU - Gaydarova, Maria

AU - Gianoglio, Bruno

AU - Parvex, Paloma

AU - Gomes, Clara

AU - Heaf, James G.

AU - Podracka, Ludmila

AU - Kuzmanovska, Dafina

AU - Molchanova, Maria S.

AU - Pankratenko, Tatiana E.

AU - Papachristou, Fotios

AU - Reusz, G.

AU - Sanahuja, Maria Josè

AU - Shroff, Rukshana

AU - Groothoff, Jaap W.

AU - Schaefer, Franz

AU - Verrina, Enrico

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Background and objectives Data on mineral metabolism in pediatric renal transplant recipients largely arise from small single-center studies. In adult patients, abnormal mineral levels are related to a higher risk of graft failure. This study used data from the European Society for Paediatric Nephrology/European Renal Association– European Dialysis and Transplant Association Registry to study the prevalence and potential determinants of mineral abnormalities, as well as the predictive value of a disturbed mineral level on graft survival in a large cohort of European pediatric renal transplant recipients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study included 1237 children (0–17 years) from 10 European countries, who had serum calcium, phosphorus, and parathyroid hormone measurements from 2000 onward. Abnormalities of mineral metabolism were defined according to European guidelines on prevention and treatment of renal osteodystrophy in children on chronic renal failure. Results Abnormal serum phosphorus levels were observed in 25% (14% hypophosphatemia and 11% hyperphosphatemia), altered serum calcium in 30% (19% hypocalcemia, 11% hypercalcemia), and hyperparathyroidism in 41% of the patients. A longer time since transplantation was associated with a lower risk of having mineral levels above target range. Serum phosphorus levels were inversely associated with eGFR, and levels above the recommended targets were associated with a higher risk of graft failure independently of eGFR. Conclusions Abnormalities in mineral metabolism are common after pediatric renal transplantation in Europe and are associated with graft dysfunction.

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