Mikroelektródok az orvosi diagnosztikában

Translated title of the contribution: Microelectrodes and their application in diagnostic medicine

András Gyorffy, Dóra Makai, Balázs Gyorffy, Gábor Harsányi, Zsolt Tulassay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Microelectrodes are in common use in medical detection systems. The binding of two complementary nucleic acid sequences is called hybridization. Today the major obstacle of large-scale hybridization approaches is the large time-dependency of a single reaction, which is up to 16 hours. As the DNA molecules can be electronically charged, the binding could be facilitated and confirmed using an electronic control system. The authors' team aimed to develop a microelectrode system capable for the detection and control of hybridization. A microelectrode head is immersed in small liquid drop. Here, the platinum counterelectrode is surrounded by a non-conducting quartz capillary. The reference electrode is cloridized silver immersed in saturated Ag/Cl dilution. The Ag/AgCl/1 M KCl +AgCl microelectrode in stabilized against the calomel electrode in the first hours, and remains stable between 7th and 30th hours. This can be verified by the minimal drop in the potential difference. Thus the AgCl saturated KCl electrode is usable for several days for actual measurements. The detector is controlled by an attached computer. The system can be used to detect hybridization in a micro-cell located on a gold-plate. The electrode can be dismounted and reused after repeated cloridization of the Ag wire. The microelectrode is simple, cheap; thus is best suited for application in future automated diagnostic detection systems.

Original languageHungarian
Pages (from-to)1703-1708
Number of pages6
JournalOrvosi Hetilap
Volume147
Issue number35
Publication statusPublished - Sep 3 2006

Fingerprint

Microelectrodes
Medicine
Electrodes
Quartz
Platinum
Silver
Gold
Nucleic Acids
Head
DNA

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Mikroelektródok az orvosi diagnosztikában. / Gyorffy, András; Makai, Dóra; Gyorffy, Balázs; Harsányi, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt.

In: Orvosi Hetilap, Vol. 147, No. 35, 03.09.2006, p. 1703-1708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gyorffy, A, Makai, D, Gyorffy, B, Harsányi, G & Tulassay, Z 2006, 'Mikroelektródok az orvosi diagnosztikában', Orvosi Hetilap, vol. 147, no. 35, pp. 1703-1708.
Gyorffy, András ; Makai, Dóra ; Gyorffy, Balázs ; Harsányi, Gábor ; Tulassay, Zsolt. / Mikroelektródok az orvosi diagnosztikában. In: Orvosi Hetilap. 2006 ; Vol. 147, No. 35. pp. 1703-1708.
@article{535cc341481a4c61bb790c83b03a9706,
title = "Mikroelektr{\'o}dok az orvosi diagnosztik{\'a}ban",
abstract = "Microelectrodes are in common use in medical detection systems. The binding of two complementary nucleic acid sequences is called hybridization. Today the major obstacle of large-scale hybridization approaches is the large time-dependency of a single reaction, which is up to 16 hours. As the DNA molecules can be electronically charged, the binding could be facilitated and confirmed using an electronic control system. The authors' team aimed to develop a microelectrode system capable for the detection and control of hybridization. A microelectrode head is immersed in small liquid drop. Here, the platinum counterelectrode is surrounded by a non-conducting quartz capillary. The reference electrode is cloridized silver immersed in saturated Ag/Cl dilution. The Ag/AgCl/1 M KCl +AgCl microelectrode in stabilized against the calomel electrode in the first hours, and remains stable between 7th and 30th hours. This can be verified by the minimal drop in the potential difference. Thus the AgCl saturated KCl electrode is usable for several days for actual measurements. The detector is controlled by an attached computer. The system can be used to detect hybridization in a micro-cell located on a gold-plate. The electrode can be dismounted and reused after repeated cloridization of the Ag wire. The microelectrode is simple, cheap; thus is best suited for application in future automated diagnostic detection systems.",
keywords = "DNA immobilization, DNA microarrays, Hybridization, Microelectrode, Oligonucleotide",
author = "Andr{\'a}s Gyorffy and D{\'o}ra Makai and Bal{\'a}zs Gyorffy and G{\'a}bor Hars{\'a}nyi and Zsolt Tulassay",
year = "2006",
month = "9",
day = "3",
language = "Hungarian",
volume = "147",
pages = "1703--1708",
journal = "Orvosi Hetilap",
issn = "0030-6002",
publisher = "Akademiai Kiado",
number = "35",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mikroelektródok az orvosi diagnosztikában

AU - Gyorffy, András

AU - Makai, Dóra

AU - Gyorffy, Balázs

AU - Harsányi, Gábor

AU - Tulassay, Zsolt

PY - 2006/9/3

Y1 - 2006/9/3

N2 - Microelectrodes are in common use in medical detection systems. The binding of two complementary nucleic acid sequences is called hybridization. Today the major obstacle of large-scale hybridization approaches is the large time-dependency of a single reaction, which is up to 16 hours. As the DNA molecules can be electronically charged, the binding could be facilitated and confirmed using an electronic control system. The authors' team aimed to develop a microelectrode system capable for the detection and control of hybridization. A microelectrode head is immersed in small liquid drop. Here, the platinum counterelectrode is surrounded by a non-conducting quartz capillary. The reference electrode is cloridized silver immersed in saturated Ag/Cl dilution. The Ag/AgCl/1 M KCl +AgCl microelectrode in stabilized against the calomel electrode in the first hours, and remains stable between 7th and 30th hours. This can be verified by the minimal drop in the potential difference. Thus the AgCl saturated KCl electrode is usable for several days for actual measurements. The detector is controlled by an attached computer. The system can be used to detect hybridization in a micro-cell located on a gold-plate. The electrode can be dismounted and reused after repeated cloridization of the Ag wire. The microelectrode is simple, cheap; thus is best suited for application in future automated diagnostic detection systems.

AB - Microelectrodes are in common use in medical detection systems. The binding of two complementary nucleic acid sequences is called hybridization. Today the major obstacle of large-scale hybridization approaches is the large time-dependency of a single reaction, which is up to 16 hours. As the DNA molecules can be electronically charged, the binding could be facilitated and confirmed using an electronic control system. The authors' team aimed to develop a microelectrode system capable for the detection and control of hybridization. A microelectrode head is immersed in small liquid drop. Here, the platinum counterelectrode is surrounded by a non-conducting quartz capillary. The reference electrode is cloridized silver immersed in saturated Ag/Cl dilution. The Ag/AgCl/1 M KCl +AgCl microelectrode in stabilized against the calomel electrode in the first hours, and remains stable between 7th and 30th hours. This can be verified by the minimal drop in the potential difference. Thus the AgCl saturated KCl electrode is usable for several days for actual measurements. The detector is controlled by an attached computer. The system can be used to detect hybridization in a micro-cell located on a gold-plate. The electrode can be dismounted and reused after repeated cloridization of the Ag wire. The microelectrode is simple, cheap; thus is best suited for application in future automated diagnostic detection systems.

KW - DNA immobilization

KW - DNA microarrays

KW - Hybridization

KW - Microelectrode

KW - Oligonucleotide

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34748901197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34748901197&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 17051747

AN - SCOPUS:34748901197

VL - 147

SP - 1703

EP - 1708

JO - Orvosi Hetilap

JF - Orvosi Hetilap

SN - 0030-6002

IS - 35

ER -