Microbial action formed Jurassic Mn-carbonate ore deposit in only a few hundred years (Úrkút, Hungary)

Marta Polgari, J. R. Hein, A. Tóth, E. Pal-Molnár, T. Vigh, L. Biró, K. Fintor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The Úrkút (Hungary) manganese (Mn) ore, hosted by Jurassic black shale, was studied using high-resolution mineralogical, microtextural, and chemical methods. Two independent superimposed biostructures were identifi ed consisting of rhythmic laminations that provide important proxies for paleoenvironments and duration of ore formation. Millimeter-scale laminae refl ect a depositional series of Fe-rich biomats, mineralized microbially produced sedimentary structures. These biomats formed at the sediment-water interface under dysoxic and neutral pH conditions by enzymatic Fe 2+ oxidizing processes that may have developed on a daily to weekly growth cycle. The early diagenetic sedimentary ore is composed of Ca rhodochrosite, celadonite, and smectite, and also shows a 100- m-scale element oscillation that produces Mn(Ca)-rich and Si(Fe clay)-rich microlaminae. This microlamination may refl ect a 10 h to daily rhythmicity produced by the growth of microbial communities. If true, then the giant Úrkút ore deposit may have formed over hundreds of years, rather than hundreds of thousands of years as previously thought.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)903-906
Number of pages4
JournalGeology
Volume40
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2012

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ore deposit
manganese
Jurassic
carbonate
celadonite
rhodochrosite
black shale
chemical method
lamination
sedimentary structure
sediment-water interface
paleoenvironment
smectite
microbial community
oscillation
clay
ore

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geology

Cite this

Polgari, M., Hein, J. R., Tóth, A., Pal-Molnár, E., Vigh, T., Biró, L., & Fintor, K. (2012). Microbial action formed Jurassic Mn-carbonate ore deposit in only a few hundred years (Úrkút, Hungary). Geology, 40(10), 903-906. https://doi.org/10.1130/G33304.1

Microbial action formed Jurassic Mn-carbonate ore deposit in only a few hundred years (Úrkút, Hungary). / Polgari, Marta; Hein, J. R.; Tóth, A.; Pal-Molnár, E.; Vigh, T.; Biró, L.; Fintor, K.

In: Geology, Vol. 40, No. 10, 10.2012, p. 903-906.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Polgari, M, Hein, JR, Tóth, A, Pal-Molnár, E, Vigh, T, Biró, L & Fintor, K 2012, 'Microbial action formed Jurassic Mn-carbonate ore deposit in only a few hundred years (Úrkút, Hungary)', Geology, vol. 40, no. 10, pp. 903-906. https://doi.org/10.1130/G33304.1
Polgari, Marta ; Hein, J. R. ; Tóth, A. ; Pal-Molnár, E. ; Vigh, T. ; Biró, L. ; Fintor, K. / Microbial action formed Jurassic Mn-carbonate ore deposit in only a few hundred years (Úrkút, Hungary). In: Geology. 2012 ; Vol. 40, No. 10. pp. 903-906.
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