Metallicity in fullerides

K. Kamarás, Gyöngyi Klupp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Metallic salts formed from fullerenes became popular because of their superconducting properties with a relatively high transition temperature, and were initially regarded as conventional metals and superconductors. Recently, owing to improved synthetic methods and a renewed interest in the study of their physical properties, many of them were found to exhibit exotic metallic and superconducting phases. In this paper, we summarize earlier results on unconventional metallic fulleride phases as well as the newly discovered expanded fulleride superconductors. The proximity of the Mott transition, a typical solid-state effect, results in molecular crystals, where molecular spectroscopic methods prove very successful. We concentrate on infrared and optical spectroscopy which is very well suited to follow metallicity and phase transitions in this class of substances. This journal is

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7366-7378
Number of pages13
JournalDalton Transactions
Volume43
Issue number20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 28 2014

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Superconducting materials
Fullerenes
Molecular crystals
Infrared spectroscopy
Physical properties
Salts
Phase transitions
Metals
Optical spectroscopy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Inorganic Chemistry

Cite this

Metallicity in fullerides. / Kamarás, K.; Klupp, Gyöngyi.

In: Dalton Transactions, Vol. 43, No. 20, 28.05.2014, p. 7366-7378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kamarás, K. ; Klupp, Gyöngyi. / Metallicity in fullerides. In: Dalton Transactions. 2014 ; Vol. 43, No. 20. pp. 7366-7378.
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