Metabotrop glutamate receptor type 1a expressing unipolar brush cells in the cerebellar cortex of different species

A comparative quantitative study

J. Takács, Ljudmila Markova, Zsolt Borostyánköi, T. Görcs, J. Hámori

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Abstract

Morphology, distribution and number of unipolar brush cells (UBCs) was studied in the cerebellar vermal lobules I-X of the chicken, rat, guinea pig, cat, and monkey using monoclonal mGluR1a antibody as a marker to visualise these recently described nerve cells (Mugnaini and Floris [1994] J. Comp. Neurol. 339:174-180; Mugnaini et al. [1994] Synapse 16:284-311). The morphological appearance of mGluR1a immunopositive UBCs is similar in all species investigated: they are small cells, having a single, relatively short and thick dendrite, terminating in brush-like dendrioles. Although this, probably excitatory, cell type can be found all over the cerebellar cortex, highest density of UBCs can be seen in the vermal cortex. The present study, therefore, was focused on the quantitative morphology and distribution of UBCs in the 10 lobules of the vermis. Calculating the number of UBCs/1 Purkinje cell (PC), we have found differences in this value (average in vermal lobules I-X) from 1.04 in rat, 1.10 in chicken, 1.16 in guinea pig, 2.27 in monkey, and up to 2.44 in cat. The highest density of UBCs was observed in lobules I, IX, and X, whereas the lowest number of UBCs/1 PC was found in lobules IV-VI (in the mammals) and in lobules VII-VIII (in the chicken). In mammals, particularly the monkey and cat, an increased presence of UBCs was observed in vermal sub-lobules VIc-VIIb,c, a region defined as the oculomotor vermis because of its role in the control of saccadic eye movement. There is also a basic difference between chicken and mammals in the distribution of UBCs within the lobules: in mammals, the lowest density of these nerve cells was found in the peripheral portion of the lobules, near to the pia, while in the chicken, in contrast, the density of UBCs was the highest subpially with fewer UBCs located in the deepest curvature of the lobules. Finally, the functional significance of the differences in the density and in the distribution pattern of UBCs in the cerebellar vermis between the phylogenetically different species investigated is briefly discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)733-748
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Neuroscience Research
Volume55
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - Mar 15 1999

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Cerebellar Cortex
Glutamate Receptors
Chickens
Mammals
Haplorhini
Cats
Purkinje Cells
Guinea Pigs
Neurons
Saccades
Dendrites
Synapses

Keywords

  • Cerebellum
  • MGluR1a
  • UBC

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

@article{92a5672a732a4f749bb68cb6e6962679,
title = "Metabotrop glutamate receptor type 1a expressing unipolar brush cells in the cerebellar cortex of different species: A comparative quantitative study",
abstract = "Morphology, distribution and number of unipolar brush cells (UBCs) was studied in the cerebellar vermal lobules I-X of the chicken, rat, guinea pig, cat, and monkey using monoclonal mGluR1a antibody as a marker to visualise these recently described nerve cells (Mugnaini and Floris [1994] J. Comp. Neurol. 339:174-180; Mugnaini et al. [1994] Synapse 16:284-311). The morphological appearance of mGluR1a immunopositive UBCs is similar in all species investigated: they are small cells, having a single, relatively short and thick dendrite, terminating in brush-like dendrioles. Although this, probably excitatory, cell type can be found all over the cerebellar cortex, highest density of UBCs can be seen in the vermal cortex. The present study, therefore, was focused on the quantitative morphology and distribution of UBCs in the 10 lobules of the vermis. Calculating the number of UBCs/1 Purkinje cell (PC), we have found differences in this value (average in vermal lobules I-X) from 1.04 in rat, 1.10 in chicken, 1.16 in guinea pig, 2.27 in monkey, and up to 2.44 in cat. The highest density of UBCs was observed in lobules I, IX, and X, whereas the lowest number of UBCs/1 PC was found in lobules IV-VI (in the mammals) and in lobules VII-VIII (in the chicken). In mammals, particularly the monkey and cat, an increased presence of UBCs was observed in vermal sub-lobules VIc-VIIb,c, a region defined as the oculomotor vermis because of its role in the control of saccadic eye movement. There is also a basic difference between chicken and mammals in the distribution of UBCs within the lobules: in mammals, the lowest density of these nerve cells was found in the peripheral portion of the lobules, near to the pia, while in the chicken, in contrast, the density of UBCs was the highest subpially with fewer UBCs located in the deepest curvature of the lobules. Finally, the functional significance of the differences in the density and in the distribution pattern of UBCs in the cerebellar vermis between the phylogenetically different species investigated is briefly discussed.",
keywords = "Cerebellum, MGluR1a, UBC",
author = "J. Tak{\'a}cs and Ljudmila Markova and Zsolt Borosty{\'a}nk{\"o}i and T. G{\"o}rcs and J. H{\'a}mori",
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T1 - Metabotrop glutamate receptor type 1a expressing unipolar brush cells in the cerebellar cortex of different species

T2 - A comparative quantitative study

AU - Takács, J.

AU - Markova, Ljudmila

AU - Borostyánköi, Zsolt

AU - Görcs, T.

AU - Hámori, J.

PY - 1999/3/15

Y1 - 1999/3/15

N2 - Morphology, distribution and number of unipolar brush cells (UBCs) was studied in the cerebellar vermal lobules I-X of the chicken, rat, guinea pig, cat, and monkey using monoclonal mGluR1a antibody as a marker to visualise these recently described nerve cells (Mugnaini and Floris [1994] J. Comp. Neurol. 339:174-180; Mugnaini et al. [1994] Synapse 16:284-311). The morphological appearance of mGluR1a immunopositive UBCs is similar in all species investigated: they are small cells, having a single, relatively short and thick dendrite, terminating in brush-like dendrioles. Although this, probably excitatory, cell type can be found all over the cerebellar cortex, highest density of UBCs can be seen in the vermal cortex. The present study, therefore, was focused on the quantitative morphology and distribution of UBCs in the 10 lobules of the vermis. Calculating the number of UBCs/1 Purkinje cell (PC), we have found differences in this value (average in vermal lobules I-X) from 1.04 in rat, 1.10 in chicken, 1.16 in guinea pig, 2.27 in monkey, and up to 2.44 in cat. The highest density of UBCs was observed in lobules I, IX, and X, whereas the lowest number of UBCs/1 PC was found in lobules IV-VI (in the mammals) and in lobules VII-VIII (in the chicken). In mammals, particularly the monkey and cat, an increased presence of UBCs was observed in vermal sub-lobules VIc-VIIb,c, a region defined as the oculomotor vermis because of its role in the control of saccadic eye movement. There is also a basic difference between chicken and mammals in the distribution of UBCs within the lobules: in mammals, the lowest density of these nerve cells was found in the peripheral portion of the lobules, near to the pia, while in the chicken, in contrast, the density of UBCs was the highest subpially with fewer UBCs located in the deepest curvature of the lobules. Finally, the functional significance of the differences in the density and in the distribution pattern of UBCs in the cerebellar vermis between the phylogenetically different species investigated is briefly discussed.

AB - Morphology, distribution and number of unipolar brush cells (UBCs) was studied in the cerebellar vermal lobules I-X of the chicken, rat, guinea pig, cat, and monkey using monoclonal mGluR1a antibody as a marker to visualise these recently described nerve cells (Mugnaini and Floris [1994] J. Comp. Neurol. 339:174-180; Mugnaini et al. [1994] Synapse 16:284-311). The morphological appearance of mGluR1a immunopositive UBCs is similar in all species investigated: they are small cells, having a single, relatively short and thick dendrite, terminating in brush-like dendrioles. Although this, probably excitatory, cell type can be found all over the cerebellar cortex, highest density of UBCs can be seen in the vermal cortex. The present study, therefore, was focused on the quantitative morphology and distribution of UBCs in the 10 lobules of the vermis. Calculating the number of UBCs/1 Purkinje cell (PC), we have found differences in this value (average in vermal lobules I-X) from 1.04 in rat, 1.10 in chicken, 1.16 in guinea pig, 2.27 in monkey, and up to 2.44 in cat. The highest density of UBCs was observed in lobules I, IX, and X, whereas the lowest number of UBCs/1 PC was found in lobules IV-VI (in the mammals) and in lobules VII-VIII (in the chicken). In mammals, particularly the monkey and cat, an increased presence of UBCs was observed in vermal sub-lobules VIc-VIIb,c, a region defined as the oculomotor vermis because of its role in the control of saccadic eye movement. There is also a basic difference between chicken and mammals in the distribution of UBCs within the lobules: in mammals, the lowest density of these nerve cells was found in the peripheral portion of the lobules, near to the pia, while in the chicken, in contrast, the density of UBCs was the highest subpially with fewer UBCs located in the deepest curvature of the lobules. Finally, the functional significance of the differences in the density and in the distribution pattern of UBCs in the cerebellar vermis between the phylogenetically different species investigated is briefly discussed.

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