Metabolic status in children and its transitions during childhood and adolescence - The IDEFICS/I.Family study

Claudia Börnhorst, Paola Russo, Toomas Veidebaum, Michael Tornaritis, Dénes Molnár, Lauren Lissner, Staffan Marild, Stefaan De Henauw, Luis A. Moreno, Timm Intemann, Maike Wolters, Wolfgang Ahrens, Anna Floegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: This study aimed to investigate metabolic status in children and its transitions into adolescence. Methods: The analysis was based on 6768 children who participated in the European IDEFICS/I.Family cohort (T0 2007/2008, T1 2009/2010 and/or T3 2013/2014; mean ages: 6.6, 8.4 and 12.0 years, respectively) and provided at least two measurements of waist circumference, blood pressure, blood glucose and lipids over time. Latent transition analysis was used to identify groups with similar metabolic status and to estimate transition probabilities. Results: The best-fitting model identified five latent groups: (i) metabolically healthy (61.5%; probability for group membership at T0); (ii) abdominal obesity (15.9%); (iii) hypertension (7.0%); (iv) dyslipidaemia (9.0%); and (v) several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components (6.6%). The probability of metabolically healthy children at T0 remaining healthy at T1 was 86.6%; when transitioning from T1 to T3, it was 90.1%. Metabolically healthy children further had a 6.7% probability of developing abdominal obesity at T1. Children with abdominal obesity at T0 had an 18.5% probability of developing several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components at T1. The subgroup with dyslipidaemia at T0 had the highest chances of becoming metabolically healthy at T1 (32.4%) or at T3 (35.1%). Only a minor proportion of children showing several MetS components at T0 were classified as healthy at follow-up; 99.8% and 88.3% remained in the group with several disorders at T1 and T3, respectively. Conclusions: Our study identified five distinct metabolic statuses in children and adolescents. Although lipid disturbances seem to be quite reversible, abdominal obesity is likely to be followed by further metabolic disturbances.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1673-1683
Number of pages11
JournalInternational journal of epidemiology
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2019

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Abdominal Obesity
Dyslipidemias
Lipids
Waist Circumference
Blood Glucose
Blood Pressure
Hypertension

Keywords

  • Dyslipidaemia
  • Glucose disturbances
  • Hypertension
  • I.Family
  • IDEFICS
  • Latent transition analysis
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • Waist circumference

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Metabolic status in children and its transitions during childhood and adolescence - The IDEFICS/I.Family study. / Börnhorst, Claudia; Russo, Paola; Veidebaum, Toomas; Tornaritis, Michael; Molnár, Dénes; Lissner, Lauren; Marild, Staffan; De Henauw, Stefaan; Moreno, Luis A.; Intemann, Timm; Wolters, Maike; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Floegel, Anna.

In: International journal of epidemiology, Vol. 48, No. 5, 01.10.2019, p. 1673-1683.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Börnhorst, C, Russo, P, Veidebaum, T, Tornaritis, M, Molnár, D, Lissner, L, Marild, S, De Henauw, S, Moreno, LA, Intemann, T, Wolters, M, Ahrens, W & Floegel, A 2019, 'Metabolic status in children and its transitions during childhood and adolescence - The IDEFICS/I.Family study', International journal of epidemiology, vol. 48, no. 5, pp. 1673-1683. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyz097
Börnhorst, Claudia ; Russo, Paola ; Veidebaum, Toomas ; Tornaritis, Michael ; Molnár, Dénes ; Lissner, Lauren ; Marild, Staffan ; De Henauw, Stefaan ; Moreno, Luis A. ; Intemann, Timm ; Wolters, Maike ; Ahrens, Wolfgang ; Floegel, Anna. / Metabolic status in children and its transitions during childhood and adolescence - The IDEFICS/I.Family study. In: International journal of epidemiology. 2019 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 1673-1683.
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abstract = "Background: This study aimed to investigate metabolic status in children and its transitions into adolescence. Methods: The analysis was based on 6768 children who participated in the European IDEFICS/I.Family cohort (T0 2007/2008, T1 2009/2010 and/or T3 2013/2014; mean ages: 6.6, 8.4 and 12.0 years, respectively) and provided at least two measurements of waist circumference, blood pressure, blood glucose and lipids over time. Latent transition analysis was used to identify groups with similar metabolic status and to estimate transition probabilities. Results: The best-fitting model identified five latent groups: (i) metabolically healthy (61.5{\%}; probability for group membership at T0); (ii) abdominal obesity (15.9{\%}); (iii) hypertension (7.0{\%}); (iv) dyslipidaemia (9.0{\%}); and (v) several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components (6.6{\%}). The probability of metabolically healthy children at T0 remaining healthy at T1 was 86.6{\%}; when transitioning from T1 to T3, it was 90.1{\%}. Metabolically healthy children further had a 6.7{\%} probability of developing abdominal obesity at T1. Children with abdominal obesity at T0 had an 18.5{\%} probability of developing several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components at T1. The subgroup with dyslipidaemia at T0 had the highest chances of becoming metabolically healthy at T1 (32.4{\%}) or at T3 (35.1{\%}). Only a minor proportion of children showing several MetS components at T0 were classified as healthy at follow-up; 99.8{\%} and 88.3{\%} remained in the group with several disorders at T1 and T3, respectively. Conclusions: Our study identified five distinct metabolic statuses in children and adolescents. Although lipid disturbances seem to be quite reversible, abdominal obesity is likely to be followed by further metabolic disturbances.",
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author = "Claudia B{\"o}rnhorst and Paola Russo and Toomas Veidebaum and Michael Tornaritis and D{\'e}nes Moln{\'a}r and Lauren Lissner and Staffan Marild and {De Henauw}, Stefaan and Moreno, {Luis A.} and Timm Intemann and Maike Wolters and Wolfgang Ahrens and Anna Floegel",
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AU - Börnhorst, Claudia

AU - Russo, Paola

AU - Veidebaum, Toomas

AU - Tornaritis, Michael

AU - Molnár, Dénes

AU - Lissner, Lauren

AU - Marild, Staffan

AU - De Henauw, Stefaan

AU - Moreno, Luis A.

AU - Intemann, Timm

AU - Wolters, Maike

AU - Ahrens, Wolfgang

AU - Floegel, Anna

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N2 - Background: This study aimed to investigate metabolic status in children and its transitions into adolescence. Methods: The analysis was based on 6768 children who participated in the European IDEFICS/I.Family cohort (T0 2007/2008, T1 2009/2010 and/or T3 2013/2014; mean ages: 6.6, 8.4 and 12.0 years, respectively) and provided at least two measurements of waist circumference, blood pressure, blood glucose and lipids over time. Latent transition analysis was used to identify groups with similar metabolic status and to estimate transition probabilities. Results: The best-fitting model identified five latent groups: (i) metabolically healthy (61.5%; probability for group membership at T0); (ii) abdominal obesity (15.9%); (iii) hypertension (7.0%); (iv) dyslipidaemia (9.0%); and (v) several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components (6.6%). The probability of metabolically healthy children at T0 remaining healthy at T1 was 86.6%; when transitioning from T1 to T3, it was 90.1%. Metabolically healthy children further had a 6.7% probability of developing abdominal obesity at T1. Children with abdominal obesity at T0 had an 18.5% probability of developing several metabolic syndrome (MetS) components at T1. The subgroup with dyslipidaemia at T0 had the highest chances of becoming metabolically healthy at T1 (32.4%) or at T3 (35.1%). Only a minor proportion of children showing several MetS components at T0 were classified as healthy at follow-up; 99.8% and 88.3% remained in the group with several disorders at T1 and T3, respectively. Conclusions: Our study identified five distinct metabolic statuses in children and adolescents. Although lipid disturbances seem to be quite reversible, abdominal obesity is likely to be followed by further metabolic disturbances.

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KW - Waist circumference

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