Mercury content of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus

J. Vetter, Erzsébet Berta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Production of cultivated mushrooms continues to increase at a high rate. The chemical composition of mushrooms is, therefore, of both scientific and practical importance. The mercury content of Agaricus bisporus (variety K-23), the most important cultivated mushroom species worldwide was investigated. The caps and stalks of the fruiting bodies, originating from four independent cultivation cycles, were analyzed. Sample preparation was carried out by microwave digestion of dried mushroom material. Analysis was performed by hydride generation AAS. The average Hg contents of caps and stalks were found to be low (65 μg Hg/kg DM and 55 μg Hg/kg DM, respectively). Statistical analysis of the data did not indicate any significant differences in Hg content between the caps and stalk, or between the different flushes (production waves) of cultivation. The determined mercury concentrations are an order of magnitude lower than the average reported Hg-level of wild edible mushrooms. Our data confirming low Hg levels in A. bisporus is toxicologically reassuring, in view of the fact that certain wild Agaricus species (for example A. arvensis) are Hg accumulating.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)113-116
Number of pages4
JournalFood Control
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2005

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Agaricus
Agaricus bisporus
Agaricales
Mercury
mercury
mushrooms
wild edible mushrooms
hydrides
fruiting bodies
Statistical Data Interpretation
Microwaves
statistical analysis
digestion
chemical composition
Digestion
sampling

Keywords

  • Cultivated Agaricus bisporus
  • Fruiting body
  • Mercury content

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Mercury content of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus. / Vetter, J.; Berta, Erzsébet.

In: Food Control, Vol. 16, No. 2, 02.2005, p. 113-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vetter, J. ; Berta, Erzsébet. / Mercury content of the cultivated mushroom Agaricus bisporus. In: Food Control. 2005 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 113-116.
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