Melt stabilization of polyethylene with dihydromyricetin, a natural antioxidant

B. Kirschweng, K. Bencze, M. Sárközi, B. Hégely, Gy Samu, J. Hári, D. Tátraaljai, E. Földes, M. Kállay, B. Pukánszky

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10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Experiments have been carried out to compare the stabilization effect of two flavonoid type natural antioxidants, dihydromyricetin (DHM) and quercetin (Q) in polyethylene (PE). Additive concentrations changed between 0 and 500 ppm in several steps and 1000 ppm Sandostab PEPQ phosphorus containing secondary stabilizer was also added to each compound. Both antioxidants are very efficient stabilizers for PE, sufficient melt stability was achieved already at 50 ppm DHM content. At small concentrations dihydromyricetin proved to be more efficient melt stabilizer and it protected the secondary antioxidant better than quercetin. In spite of its better efficiency in melt stabilization, polymers containing DHM had the same residual stability as those prepared with quercetin. Accordingly, the larger efficiency does not result from the larger number of active phenolic hydroxyls in the molecule, but from interactions with the phosphorous secondary stabilizer that is stronger or at least different for DHM than quercetin. In spite that DHM is a white powder, it gave the polymer a brownish color which became deeper with increasing number of extrusions and additive content. Nevertheless, both natural antioxidants can be used efficiently for the stabilization of polymers in applications in which color is of secondary importance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-200
Number of pages9
JournalPolymer Degradation and Stability
Volume133
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1 2016

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Keywords

  • Color
  • Dihydromyricetin
  • Long chain branching
  • Natural antioxidants
  • Polyethylene
  • Processing stabilization
  • Solubility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Materials Chemistry

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