Mediation of humoral catecholamine secretion by the renin-angiotensin system in hypotensive rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

49 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The individual contributions of, and potential interactions between, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the humoral adrenergic stress response to blood pressure regulation were examined in rainbow trout. Intravenous injection of the smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine (10 mg/kg), elicited a transient decrease in dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) and systemic vascular resistance (R(S)), and significant increases in plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and catecholamine concentrations. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors before papaverine treatment prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery, had no effect on the increase in plasma catecholamines, and resulted in greater plasma Ang II concentrations. Administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril (10-4 mol/kg), before papaverine treatment attenuated the increases in the plasma concentrations of AngII, adrenaline, and noradrenaline by 90, 79, and 40%, respectively and also prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery. By itself, lisinopril treatment caused a gradual and sustained decrease in P(DA) and R(S), and reductions in basal plasma Ang II and adrenaline concentrations. Bolus injection of a catecholamine cocktail (4nmol/kg noradrenaline plus 40nmol/kg adrenaline) in the lisinopril+papaverine-treated trout, to supplement their circulating catecholamine concentrations and mimic those observed in fish treated only with papaverine, resulted in a temporary recovery in P(DA) and R(S). These results indicate that the RAS and the acute humoral adrenergic response are both recruited during an acute hypotensive stress, and have important roles in the compensatory response to hypotension in rainbow trout. However, whereas the contribution of the RAS to P(DA) recovery is largely indirect and relies on an Ang II-mediated secretion of catecholamines, the contribution from the adrenergic system is direct and relies at least in part on plasma catecholamines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-350
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Endocrinology
Volume160
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

Oncorhynchus mykiss
Renin-Angiotensin System
Papaverine
Catecholamines
Lisinopril
Angiotensin II
Adrenergic Agents
Epinephrine
Norepinephrine
Trout
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors
Intravenous Injections
Vascular Resistance
Hypotension
Adrenergic Receptors
Smooth Muscle
Arterial Pressure
Fishes
Therapeutics
Blood Pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology

Cite this

@article{0d69a57324ea4d709b78cdadd8ac55ad,
title = "Mediation of humoral catecholamine secretion by the renin-angiotensin system in hypotensive rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)",
abstract = "The individual contributions of, and potential interactions between, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the humoral adrenergic stress response to blood pressure regulation were examined in rainbow trout. Intravenous injection of the smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine (10 mg/kg), elicited a transient decrease in dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) and systemic vascular resistance (R(S)), and significant increases in plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and catecholamine concentrations. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors before papaverine treatment prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery, had no effect on the increase in plasma catecholamines, and resulted in greater plasma Ang II concentrations. Administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril (10-4 mol/kg), before papaverine treatment attenuated the increases in the plasma concentrations of AngII, adrenaline, and noradrenaline by 90, 79, and 40{\%}, respectively and also prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery. By itself, lisinopril treatment caused a gradual and sustained decrease in P(DA) and R(S), and reductions in basal plasma Ang II and adrenaline concentrations. Bolus injection of a catecholamine cocktail (4nmol/kg noradrenaline plus 40nmol/kg adrenaline) in the lisinopril+papaverine-treated trout, to supplement their circulating catecholamine concentrations and mimic those observed in fish treated only with papaverine, resulted in a temporary recovery in P(DA) and R(S). These results indicate that the RAS and the acute humoral adrenergic response are both recruited during an acute hypotensive stress, and have important roles in the compensatory response to hypotension in rainbow trout. However, whereas the contribution of the RAS to P(DA) recovery is largely indirect and relies on an Ang II-mediated secretion of catecholamines, the contribution from the adrenergic system is direct and relies at least in part on plasma catecholamines.",
author = "B. Sperl{\'a}gh and Z. Mergl and Zs Jur{\'a}nyi and E. V{\'i}zi and G. Makara",
year = "1999",
language = "English",
volume = "160",
pages = "343--350",
journal = "Journal of Endocrinology",
issn = "0022-0795",
publisher = "Society for Endocrinology",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mediation of humoral catecholamine secretion by the renin-angiotensin system in hypotensive rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

AU - Sperlágh, B.

AU - Mergl, Z.

AU - Jurányi, Zs

AU - Vízi, E.

AU - Makara, G.

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - The individual contributions of, and potential interactions between, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the humoral adrenergic stress response to blood pressure regulation were examined in rainbow trout. Intravenous injection of the smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine (10 mg/kg), elicited a transient decrease in dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) and systemic vascular resistance (R(S)), and significant increases in plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and catecholamine concentrations. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors before papaverine treatment prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery, had no effect on the increase in plasma catecholamines, and resulted in greater plasma Ang II concentrations. Administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril (10-4 mol/kg), before papaverine treatment attenuated the increases in the plasma concentrations of AngII, adrenaline, and noradrenaline by 90, 79, and 40%, respectively and also prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery. By itself, lisinopril treatment caused a gradual and sustained decrease in P(DA) and R(S), and reductions in basal plasma Ang II and adrenaline concentrations. Bolus injection of a catecholamine cocktail (4nmol/kg noradrenaline plus 40nmol/kg adrenaline) in the lisinopril+papaverine-treated trout, to supplement their circulating catecholamine concentrations and mimic those observed in fish treated only with papaverine, resulted in a temporary recovery in P(DA) and R(S). These results indicate that the RAS and the acute humoral adrenergic response are both recruited during an acute hypotensive stress, and have important roles in the compensatory response to hypotension in rainbow trout. However, whereas the contribution of the RAS to P(DA) recovery is largely indirect and relies on an Ang II-mediated secretion of catecholamines, the contribution from the adrenergic system is direct and relies at least in part on plasma catecholamines.

AB - The individual contributions of, and potential interactions between, the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the humoral adrenergic stress response to blood pressure regulation were examined in rainbow trout. Intravenous injection of the smooth muscle relaxant, papaverine (10 mg/kg), elicited a transient decrease in dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) and systemic vascular resistance (R(S)), and significant increases in plasma angiotensin II (Ang II) and catecholamine concentrations. Blockade of α-adrenoceptors before papaverine treatment prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery, had no effect on the increase in plasma catecholamines, and resulted in greater plasma Ang II concentrations. Administration of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, lisinopril (10-4 mol/kg), before papaverine treatment attenuated the increases in the plasma concentrations of AngII, adrenaline, and noradrenaline by 90, 79, and 40%, respectively and also prevented P(DA) and R(S) recovery. By itself, lisinopril treatment caused a gradual and sustained decrease in P(DA) and R(S), and reductions in basal plasma Ang II and adrenaline concentrations. Bolus injection of a catecholamine cocktail (4nmol/kg noradrenaline plus 40nmol/kg adrenaline) in the lisinopril+papaverine-treated trout, to supplement their circulating catecholamine concentrations and mimic those observed in fish treated only with papaverine, resulted in a temporary recovery in P(DA) and R(S). These results indicate that the RAS and the acute humoral adrenergic response are both recruited during an acute hypotensive stress, and have important roles in the compensatory response to hypotension in rainbow trout. However, whereas the contribution of the RAS to P(DA) recovery is largely indirect and relies on an Ang II-mediated secretion of catecholamines, the contribution from the adrenergic system is direct and relies at least in part on plasma catecholamines.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0033093569&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0033093569&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10076181

AN - SCOPUS:0033093569

VL - 160

SP - 343

EP - 350

JO - Journal of Endocrinology

JF - Journal of Endocrinology

SN - 0022-0795

IS - 3

ER -