Mechanism of chlorpromazine binding by Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria

J. Molnár, J. Fischer, M. J. Nakamura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Chlorpromazine forms charge-transfer complexes with xanthene dyes in bacteria. These complexes permit the differentiation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both light and polarization microscopy. The birefringence induced by the charge-transfer complex might explain the molecular basis of bacterial staining. The charge-transfer complexes formed between chorpromazine and xanthene dyes accumulate in the bacterial cell, mainly inside the bacterial cell wall. The complexes give the cells a color, which depends on the chemical composition of the staining structure, and in particular the polysaccharides of the cell wall in bacteria. Metachromatic granules were seen inside Gram-positive bacteria after chlorpromazine and rose bengal staining. Although the nature of these granules remains unclear, this type of binding may have a role in the inhibition of biochemical processes in the bacterial cells.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)309-314
Number of pages6
JournalAntonie van Leeuwenhoek, International Journal of General and Molecular Microbiology
Volume62
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1992

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Chlorpromazine
Xanthenes
Gram-Negative Bacteria
Staining and Labeling
Cell Wall
Biochemical Phenomena
Coloring Agents
Polarization Microscopy
Birefringence
Bacteria
Rose Bengal
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Polysaccharides
Color
Light

Keywords

  • birefringence
  • charge-transfer complexes
  • chlorpromazine
  • Gram-positive and Gram-negative cell wall stain
  • xanthene dyes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

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abstract = "Chlorpromazine forms charge-transfer complexes with xanthene dyes in bacteria. These complexes permit the differentiation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in both light and polarization microscopy. The birefringence induced by the charge-transfer complex might explain the molecular basis of bacterial staining. The charge-transfer complexes formed between chorpromazine and xanthene dyes accumulate in the bacterial cell, mainly inside the bacterial cell wall. The complexes give the cells a color, which depends on the chemical composition of the staining structure, and in particular the polysaccharides of the cell wall in bacteria. Metachromatic granules were seen inside Gram-positive bacteria after chlorpromazine and rose bengal staining. Although the nature of these granules remains unclear, this type of binding may have a role in the inhibition of biochemical processes in the bacterial cells.",
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AU - Fischer, J.

AU - Nakamura, M. J.

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