Mechanism of action of atrial natriuretic peptides does not involve adenylate cyclase system of different rat brain areas

H. Geiger, U. Bahner, M. Palkovits, E. Mezey, A. Heidland

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Abstract

Recent studies provide more and more evidence that the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may link the heart, kidneys, adrenals, blood vesels, and brain in a complex system which is involved in the regulation of body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis as well as blood pressure regulation. High and low molecular weight forms of ANP have been proved in various tissues, including the central nervous system. The biochemical action mechanism of ANP in the brain is still not fully understood. ANP has been shown to bind to specific receptors in the brain and inhibit adenylate cyclase activity in rat anterior and posterior pituitary homogenates, while others failed to confirm those data. In the present study, we investigated if ANP, both α-rANP(3-28) and α-rANP(4-28) which corresponds to Auriculin B, has any effect on basal or stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in homogenates of different brain nuclei.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S-98-S-100
JournalKidney International
Volume34
Issue numberSUPPL. 25
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

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