Measurement of factor XIII activity in plasma

E. Katona, Krisztina Pénzes, Éva Molnár, L. Muszbek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is converted by thrombin and Ca 2+ into an active transglutaminase (FXIIIa) in the final phase of coagulation cascade. Its main function is the mechanical stabilization of fibrin clot and its protection from fibrinolysis by cross-linking of fibrin chains and α2-plasmin inhibitor to fibrin. In non-substituted patients FXIII deficiency is a severe hemorrhagic diathesis, not infrequently with fatal consequences. The main reason for using FXIII assays is the diagnosis of FXIII deficiency. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive critical evaluation of the methods reported for the determination of FXIII activity in the plasma. Such methods are based on two principles: 1) measurement of labeled amines incorporated by FXIIIa into a glutamine residue of a substrate protein, 2) monitoring ammonia released from a peptide bound glutamine residue by FXIIIa using NAD(P)H dependent glutamate dehydrogenase indicator reaction. The incorporation assays are sensitive, but cumbersome and time-consuming, they are difficult to standardize and cannot be automated. The ammonia release assays are less sensitive, but quick, well standardized, and can be automated; this type of assay is recommended for the screening of FXIII deficiency. The traditional clot solubility assay should not be used for this purpose.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1191-1202
Number of pages12
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume50
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

Fingerprint

Factor XIII Deficiency
Factor XIII
Fibrin
Assays
Glutamine
Plasmas
Ammonia
Cross Protection
Hemorrhagic Disorders
Glutamate Dehydrogenase
Antifibrinolytic Agents
Transglutaminases
Fibrinolysis
Thrombin
NAD
Solubility
Amines
Peptides
Coagulation
Screening

Keywords

  • Factor XIII
  • Factor XIII assays
  • Factor XIII deficiency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Measurement of factor XIII activity in plasma. / Katona, E.; Pénzes, Krisztina; Molnár, Éva; Muszbek, L.

In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 50, No. 7, 08.2012, p. 1191-1202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Katona, E. ; Pénzes, Krisztina ; Molnár, Éva ; Muszbek, L. / Measurement of factor XIII activity in plasma. In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 50, No. 7. pp. 1191-1202.
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