Mature but not fetal or neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion transplants survive in the cortex of adult rats

Andrea Tuba, M. Kálmán, Vladimir V. Senatorov, Zoltán Fülöp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The transplantation of catecholaminergic tissues is a possible therapy for parkinsonism. Central nervous tissue is suitable for transplantation only in the immature stage, whereas peripheral nervous tissue can also be transplanted when mature. The present study compares the development of fetal (17-20 embryonic day, E17-20), neonatal (1-3 postnatal day, P1-3) and mature (5-6-week-old) rat superior cervical ganglia after transplantation into the cerebral cortex of adult rats. The mature transplants survived in greater proportion and preserved their structural characteristics, although a considerable proportion of the neurons died. The perinatal transplants only survived sporadically, decreased in size and the surviving remnants failed to display a structure comparable to the adult ganglion in situ. Thus, the use of adult donors is not only a possibility but a necessity when superior cervical ganglion (probably any ganglion) is transplanted. This principle is radically different from that seen in the case of central nervous tissues, and can be understood by the analysis of the time curves of cell proliferation and programmed cell death (apoptosis) observed during the perinatal development of sympathetic ganglia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-640
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Developmental Neuroscience
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1996

Fingerprint

Nerve Tissue
Superior Cervical Ganglion
Transplants
Ganglia
Transplantation
Tissue Transplantation
Sympathetic Ganglia
Parkinsonian Disorders
Fetal Development
Cerebral Cortex
Cell Death
Cell Proliferation
Tissue Donors
Apoptosis
Neurons
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Catecholaminergic tissue transplantation
  • Ganglion development
  • Ganglion transplantation
  • Neurotransplantation
  • Superior cervical ganglion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Developmental Neuroscience

Cite this

Mature but not fetal or neonatal rat superior cervical ganglion transplants survive in the cortex of adult rats. / Tuba, Andrea; Kálmán, M.; Senatorov, Vladimir V.; Fülöp, Zoltán.

In: International Journal of Developmental Neuroscience, Vol. 14, No. 5, 08.1996, p. 631-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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