Matrix metalloproteinase activities are altered in the heart and plasma during endotoxemia

Manoj M. Lalu, Tamás Csont, Richard Schulz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate whether myocardial and plasma matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities are altered during endotoxemia. Design: Prospective randomized, animal study. Setting: University research laboratory. Subjects: Male Sprague-Dawley rals, 250-300 g. Interventions: Rats were administered either bacterial lipopolysacctoride (LPS) or vehicle (pyrogen-free water). Groups of LPS-administered animals were killed at 0.5, 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hrs postinjection. Vehicle injected animals were killed at 6 hrs. Blood pressure was recorded before kill. Heart and plasma samples were analyzed by gelatin zymography and immunoblot. Measurement and Main Results: Blood pressure was significantly depressed at 3-24 hrs post-LPS injection; however, overt symptoms of endotoxemia and reduction in blood pressure were most significant 8-12 hrs posf-LPS. Heart samples from control rats revealed MMP-2 activity but no MMP-9 activity. MMP-2 activity was significantly depressed when overt symptoms of endotoxemia peaked at 8-12 hrs. Plasma MMP-2 activity significantly decreased 3-12 hrs after LPS injection. This loss of activity was associated with a loss of MMP-2 protein. In contrast, plasma MMP-9 activities were rapidly elevated following LPS injection, peaking between 1 and 12 hrs. MMP-9 activity correlated inversely with blood pressure. Conclusions: Endotoxemia induced rapid changes in MMP activity in both the myocardium and plasma. An increase in circulating MMP-9 activity may contribute to endotoxemic cardiovascular dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1332-1337
Number of pages6
JournalCritical care medicine
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2004

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Keywords

  • Endotoxemia
  • Matrix metalloproteinases
  • Myocardium
  • Plasma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

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