Maternal severe migraine and risk of congenital limb deficiencies

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Migraines occurs frequently during pregnancy; however, there are no published data on their possible teratogenic potential in a controlled epidemiological study. Therefore, we examined the risk of congenital abnormalities in infants born to women who had migraines and other headaches during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 1980 and 1996, the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities evaluated 22,843 cases (newborns or fetuses) with congenital abnormalities, 38,151 control newborn infants without any abnormalities, and 834 malformed controls with Down syndrome. RESULTS: Migraines anytime during pregnancy occurred in 565 (2.5%) mothers of the case group compared with 713 (1.9%) mothers in the control group (crude prevalence odds ratio [POR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.5) and 24 (2.9%) pregnant women in the malformed control group (crude POR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.3) The mothers of 247 cases, 533 controls, and 21 malformed controls had severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy. There was only 1 congenital abnormality group: limb deficiencies, which had a higher rate of maternal migraines during the second and third months of pregnancy both at the comparison of cases and matched controls (adjusted POR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.8) and of cases and malformed controls (adjusted FOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-3.0). There was no association between other headaches and different congenital abnormalities at the comparison of cases and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that maternal severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of congenital limb deficiencies. A similar association was not detected between congenital anomalies and other headaches during pregnancy. Our study was not based on a prior hypothesis; therefore, these data can be considered only as a signal that needs confirmation by independent data sets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)592-601
Number of pages10
JournalBirth Defects Research Part A - Clinical and Molecular Teratology
Volume76
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2006

Fingerprint

Migraine Disorders
Extremities
Mothers
Pregnancy
Confidence Intervals
Odds Ratio
Headache
Newborn Infant
Control Groups
Down Syndrome
Pregnant Women
Epidemiologic Studies
Fetus

Keywords

  • Case-control analysis
  • Congenital abnormalities
  • Headaches
  • Human teratogenic potential
  • Limb deficiencies
  • Migraine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

@article{3cd57e82fb274706b5e825cb3d5db2e1,
title = "Maternal severe migraine and risk of congenital limb deficiencies",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Migraines occurs frequently during pregnancy; however, there are no published data on their possible teratogenic potential in a controlled epidemiological study. Therefore, we examined the risk of congenital abnormalities in infants born to women who had migraines and other headaches during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 1980 and 1996, the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities evaluated 22,843 cases (newborns or fetuses) with congenital abnormalities, 38,151 control newborn infants without any abnormalities, and 834 malformed controls with Down syndrome. RESULTS: Migraines anytime during pregnancy occurred in 565 (2.5{\%}) mothers of the case group compared with 713 (1.9{\%}) mothers in the control group (crude prevalence odds ratio [POR], 1.3; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.5) and 24 (2.9{\%}) pregnant women in the malformed control group (crude POR, 0.9; 95{\%} CI, 0.6-1.3) The mothers of 247 cases, 533 controls, and 21 malformed controls had severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy. There was only 1 congenital abnormality group: limb deficiencies, which had a higher rate of maternal migraines during the second and third months of pregnancy both at the comparison of cases and matched controls (adjusted POR, 2.5; 95{\%} CI, 1.1-5.8) and of cases and malformed controls (adjusted FOR, 1.7; 95{\%} CI, 1.3-3.0). There was no association between other headaches and different congenital abnormalities at the comparison of cases and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that maternal severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of congenital limb deficiencies. A similar association was not detected between congenital anomalies and other headaches during pregnancy. Our study was not based on a prior hypothesis; therefore, these data can be considered only as a signal that needs confirmation by independent data sets.",
keywords = "Case-control analysis, Congenital abnormalities, Headaches, Human teratogenic potential, Limb deficiencies, Migraine",
author = "F. B{\'a}nhidy and N. {\'A}cs and E. Puh{\'o} and E. Czeizel",
year = "2006",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1002/bdra.20288",
language = "English",
volume = "76",
pages = "592--601",
journal = "Teratology",
issn = "1542-0752",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Maternal severe migraine and risk of congenital limb deficiencies

AU - Bánhidy, F.

AU - Ács, N.

AU - Puhó, E.

AU - Czeizel, E.

PY - 2006/8

Y1 - 2006/8

N2 - BACKGROUND: Migraines occurs frequently during pregnancy; however, there are no published data on their possible teratogenic potential in a controlled epidemiological study. Therefore, we examined the risk of congenital abnormalities in infants born to women who had migraines and other headaches during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 1980 and 1996, the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities evaluated 22,843 cases (newborns or fetuses) with congenital abnormalities, 38,151 control newborn infants without any abnormalities, and 834 malformed controls with Down syndrome. RESULTS: Migraines anytime during pregnancy occurred in 565 (2.5%) mothers of the case group compared with 713 (1.9%) mothers in the control group (crude prevalence odds ratio [POR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.5) and 24 (2.9%) pregnant women in the malformed control group (crude POR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.3) The mothers of 247 cases, 533 controls, and 21 malformed controls had severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy. There was only 1 congenital abnormality group: limb deficiencies, which had a higher rate of maternal migraines during the second and third months of pregnancy both at the comparison of cases and matched controls (adjusted POR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.8) and of cases and malformed controls (adjusted FOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-3.0). There was no association between other headaches and different congenital abnormalities at the comparison of cases and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that maternal severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of congenital limb deficiencies. A similar association was not detected between congenital anomalies and other headaches during pregnancy. Our study was not based on a prior hypothesis; therefore, these data can be considered only as a signal that needs confirmation by independent data sets.

AB - BACKGROUND: Migraines occurs frequently during pregnancy; however, there are no published data on their possible teratogenic potential in a controlled epidemiological study. Therefore, we examined the risk of congenital abnormalities in infants born to women who had migraines and other headaches during pregnancy. METHODS: Between 1980 and 1996, the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities evaluated 22,843 cases (newborns or fetuses) with congenital abnormalities, 38,151 control newborn infants without any abnormalities, and 834 malformed controls with Down syndrome. RESULTS: Migraines anytime during pregnancy occurred in 565 (2.5%) mothers of the case group compared with 713 (1.9%) mothers in the control group (crude prevalence odds ratio [POR], 1.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-1.5) and 24 (2.9%) pregnant women in the malformed control group (crude POR, 0.9; 95% CI, 0.6-1.3) The mothers of 247 cases, 533 controls, and 21 malformed controls had severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy. There was only 1 congenital abnormality group: limb deficiencies, which had a higher rate of maternal migraines during the second and third months of pregnancy both at the comparison of cases and matched controls (adjusted POR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1-5.8) and of cases and malformed controls (adjusted FOR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.3-3.0). There was no association between other headaches and different congenital abnormalities at the comparison of cases and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Our data showed that maternal severe migraines during the second and/or third months of pregnancy were associated with an increased risk of congenital limb deficiencies. A similar association was not detected between congenital anomalies and other headaches during pregnancy. Our study was not based on a prior hypothesis; therefore, these data can be considered only as a signal that needs confirmation by independent data sets.

KW - Case-control analysis

KW - Congenital abnormalities

KW - Headaches

KW - Human teratogenic potential

KW - Limb deficiencies

KW - Migraine

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