Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle

Z. Radák, Peter Apor, Jozsef Pucsok, I. Berkes, Helga Ogonovszky, G. Pavlik, Hideko Nakamoto, S. Goto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated either as products of aerobic metabolism or as a consequence of environmental mutagens, oxidatively modify DNA. Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) and endonuclease III (endo III) or their functional mammalian homologues repair 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) and damaged pyrimidines, respectively, to curb the deleterious effects of oxidative DNA alterations. A single bout of physical exercise can induce oxidative DNA damage. However, its effect on the activity of repair enzymes is not known. Here we report that the activity of a functional homolog of Fpg, human 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase (hOGG1), is increased significantly, as measured by the excision of 32P labeled damaged oligonucleotide, in human skeletal muscle after a marathon race. The AP site repair enzyme did not change significantly. Despite the large individual differences among the six subjects measured, data suggest that a single-bout of aerobic exercise increases the activity of hOGG1 which is responsible for the excision of 8-oxoG. The up-regulation of DNA repair enzymes might be an important part of the regular exercise induced adaptation process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1627-1633
Number of pages7
JournalLife Sciences
Volume72
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 21 2003

Fingerprint

DNA-Formamidopyrimidine Glycosylase
Running
DNA Repair
Muscle
Skeletal Muscle
Repair
Exercise
DNA
DNA Glycosylases
DNA Repair Enzymes
Reactive Nitrogen Species
Curbs
Pyrimidines
Deoxyribonuclease I
Mutagens
Enzymes
Metabolism
Individuality
Oligonucleotides
DNA Damage

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Base excision repair
  • DNA damage
  • DNA repair
  • Exercise
  • Oxidative stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle. / Radák, Z.; Apor, Peter; Pucsok, Jozsef; Berkes, I.; Ogonovszky, Helga; Pavlik, G.; Nakamoto, Hideko; Goto, S.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 72, No. 14, 21.02.2003, p. 1627-1633.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Radák, Z. ; Apor, Peter ; Pucsok, Jozsef ; Berkes, I. ; Ogonovszky, Helga ; Pavlik, G. ; Nakamoto, Hideko ; Goto, S. / Marathon running alters the DNA base excision repair in human skeletal muscle. In: Life Sciences. 2003 ; Vol. 72, No. 14. pp. 1627-1633.
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