Management of inflammatory bowel diseases in Eastern Europe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited data are available on the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in East European countries. The diagnostic tools and most treatment options are also available in Eastern Europe. The diagnostic procedures commonly used became more sophisticated in the past few years, with a greater use of computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and serology testing; however, double contrast barium enema, enteroclysis, and endoscopy remained standard. The medical therapy and surgical strategies are also somewhat different from those applied in Western countries. In ulcerative colitis, besides mesalazine, the use of sulphasalazine is still frequent, while azathioprine is only used in a minority of patients. The use of conventional corticosteroids is common and the rate of non-colorectal cancer associated colectomies is low. In contrast, 5-aminosalicylates are still used for maintenance in Crohn's disease and azathioprine is generally less frequently given compared with Western Europe. Biological agents have also become available about five years ago, yet their use is restricted mainly to specialised centres.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-273
Number of pages4
JournalPostgraduate Medical Journal
Volume82
Issue number966
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2006

Fingerprint

Mesalamine
Eastern Europe
Azathioprine
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Sulfasalazine
Colectomy
Biological Factors
Serology
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
Endoscopy
Adrenal Cortex Hormones
Tomography
Maintenance
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Therapeutics
Neoplasms
Barium Enema

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Management of inflammatory bowel diseases in Eastern Europe. / Lakatos, L.; Lakatos, P.

In: Postgraduate Medical Journal, Vol. 82, No. 966, 04.2006, p. 270-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e3d4048fb06047c1b475487c5235dc17,
title = "Management of inflammatory bowel diseases in Eastern Europe",
abstract = "Limited data are available on the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in East European countries. The diagnostic tools and most treatment options are also available in Eastern Europe. The diagnostic procedures commonly used became more sophisticated in the past few years, with a greater use of computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and serology testing; however, double contrast barium enema, enteroclysis, and endoscopy remained standard. The medical therapy and surgical strategies are also somewhat different from those applied in Western countries. In ulcerative colitis, besides mesalazine, the use of sulphasalazine is still frequent, while azathioprine is only used in a minority of patients. The use of conventional corticosteroids is common and the rate of non-colorectal cancer associated colectomies is low. In contrast, 5-aminosalicylates are still used for maintenance in Crohn's disease and azathioprine is generally less frequently given compared with Western Europe. Biological agents have also become available about five years ago, yet their use is restricted mainly to specialised centres.",
author = "L. Lakatos and P. Lakatos",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
doi = "10.1136/pgmj.2005.043901",
language = "English",
volume = "82",
pages = "270--273",
journal = "Postgraduate Medical Journal",
issn = "0032-5473",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "966",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Management of inflammatory bowel diseases in Eastern Europe

AU - Lakatos, L.

AU - Lakatos, P.

PY - 2006/4

Y1 - 2006/4

N2 - Limited data are available on the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in East European countries. The diagnostic tools and most treatment options are also available in Eastern Europe. The diagnostic procedures commonly used became more sophisticated in the past few years, with a greater use of computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and serology testing; however, double contrast barium enema, enteroclysis, and endoscopy remained standard. The medical therapy and surgical strategies are also somewhat different from those applied in Western countries. In ulcerative colitis, besides mesalazine, the use of sulphasalazine is still frequent, while azathioprine is only used in a minority of patients. The use of conventional corticosteroids is common and the rate of non-colorectal cancer associated colectomies is low. In contrast, 5-aminosalicylates are still used for maintenance in Crohn's disease and azathioprine is generally less frequently given compared with Western Europe. Biological agents have also become available about five years ago, yet their use is restricted mainly to specialised centres.

AB - Limited data are available on the management of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in East European countries. The diagnostic tools and most treatment options are also available in Eastern Europe. The diagnostic procedures commonly used became more sophisticated in the past few years, with a greater use of computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and serology testing; however, double contrast barium enema, enteroclysis, and endoscopy remained standard. The medical therapy and surgical strategies are also somewhat different from those applied in Western countries. In ulcerative colitis, besides mesalazine, the use of sulphasalazine is still frequent, while azathioprine is only used in a minority of patients. The use of conventional corticosteroids is common and the rate of non-colorectal cancer associated colectomies is low. In contrast, 5-aminosalicylates are still used for maintenance in Crohn's disease and azathioprine is generally less frequently given compared with Western Europe. Biological agents have also become available about five years ago, yet their use is restricted mainly to specialised centres.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645916053&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645916053&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/pgmj.2005.043901

DO - 10.1136/pgmj.2005.043901

M3 - Article

C2 - 16597815

AN - SCOPUS:33645916053

VL - 82

SP - 270

EP - 273

JO - Postgraduate Medical Journal

JF - Postgraduate Medical Journal

SN - 0032-5473

IS - 966

ER -