Malignant lymphomas in the elderly: A single institute experience highlights future directions

László Váróczy, Alpár Dankó, Zsófia Simon, L. Gergely, Zsuzsa Ress, A. Illés

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, our experience with the diagnostics and treatment of malignant lymphoma patients were analyzed, with a special consideration of the elderly. Between 1980 and 2005, there were 181 cases found (35%) among 517 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients and 46 cases (8.1%) among 565 Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) patients, who were at least 65 years old at the time of diagnosis. Comparing elderly patients to young ones, the time from first symptoms to diagnosis was significantly longer (NHL: 7.6 months versus 4.1 months, HL: 11.4 months versus 5.6 months). B-cell and indolent NHL-s were more common (92.8% versus 79.2% and 56.4% versus 35.1%) such as classical lymphocyte predominant (cLP) HL-s (30.4% versus 15.0%); however nodular sclerosis (NS) HL-s occurred less frequently (10.9% versus 32.2%). Stages were more advanced and comorbidity was more common. Primary therapies were more often inappropriate (NHL: 20.4% versus 5.1%, HL: 26.0% versus 6.0%); there were more complications, but less cases with complete remission (NHL: 17.1% versus 61.1%, HL: 63.0% versus 79.2%) and dose reductions were more commonly applied (NHL: 46.7% versus 17.2%, HL: 52.9% versus 11.3%). Remission rates were significantly worsened by dose reductions (NHL: 68.5% versus 34.5%, HL: 61.8% versus 44.4%). Appropriate therapies resulted in significantly better overall survival (OS) rates (log-rank <0.05). It can be concluded that more favourable results can be achieved in the remission and survival rates of elderly malignant lymphoma patients if the appropriate curative or palliative therapies, considering new and less toxic protocols such as supportive care, are chosen.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-53
Number of pages11
JournalArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

Fingerprint

Hodgkin Disease
Lymphoma
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
experience
comorbidity
diagnostic
Survival Rate
Direction compound
Poisons
Sclerosis
B-Cell Lymphoma
Palliative Care
Comorbidity
Therapeutics
time
Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Comorbidity
  • Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
  • Remission results
  • Survival rates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ageing
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Malignant lymphomas in the elderly : A single institute experience highlights future directions. / Váróczy, László; Dankó, Alpár; Simon, Zsófia; Gergely, L.; Ress, Zsuzsa; Illés, A.

In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Vol. 45, No. 1, 07.2007, p. 43-53.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Váróczy, László ; Dankó, Alpár ; Simon, Zsófia ; Gergely, L. ; Ress, Zsuzsa ; Illés, A. / Malignant lymphomas in the elderly : A single institute experience highlights future directions. In: Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics. 2007 ; Vol. 45, No. 1. pp. 43-53.
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