Macrophages and their products in rheumatoid arthritis

Z. Szekanecz, Alisa E. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

200 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Macrophages differentiate from peripheral-blood monocytes. Both monocytes and synovial macrophages are key players in rheumatoid arthritis. These cells are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of inflammation, leukocyte adhesion and migration, matrix degradation and angiogenesis. Macrophages express adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors and other surface antigens. They also secrete a number of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, proteases and other mediators. RECENT FINDINGS: Macrophage migration-inhibitory factor has drawn significant attention recently. This cytokine is involved in macrophage activation and cytokine production. Migration-inhibitory factor also regulates glucocorticoid sensitivity and may be a pathogenic link between rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Novel macrophage-derived chemokines and chemokine receptors have been identified. Interleukin-10 may have several proinflammatory effects that may influence its action in rheumatoid arthritis. Several proteinases including cathepsin G are produced by macrophages during rheumatoid arthritis-associated inflammatory and angiogenic events. Antirheumatic drugs, imatinib, chemokine receptor inhibitors and other specific strategies may become included in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. SUMMARY: Macrophages and their products are key players in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and may be good therapeutic targets.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-295
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Opinion in Rheumatology
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Macrophages
Chemokine Receptors
Cytokines
Monocytes
Peptide Hydrolases
Chemokine CCL22
Cathepsin G
Macrophage Migration-Inhibitory Factors
Antirheumatic Agents
Macrophage Activation
Surface Antigens
Chemokines
Interleukin-10
Glucocorticoids
Atherosclerosis
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Leukocytes
Inflammation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Angiogenesis
  • Chemokine
  • Chemokine receptor
  • Macrophage
  • Monocyte
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Macrophages and their products in rheumatoid arthritis. / Szekanecz, Z.; Koch, Alisa E.

In: Current Opinion in Rheumatology, Vol. 19, No. 3, 05.2007, p. 289-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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