Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 is increased in individuals before type 2 diabetes diagnosis but is not an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes

The Whitehall II study

Maren Carstensen, Christian Herder, Eric J. Brunner, Klaus Strassburger, A. Tabák, Michael Roden, Daniel Rwitte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1) belongs to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily, and has been reported to be involved in energy homoeostasis and weight loss and to have anti-inflammatory properties.We hypothesized that decreased concentrations of MIC-1 would be associated with higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Design and methods: We designed a nested case-control study within the Whitehall II cohort and measured serum concentrations of MIC-1 by ELISA in 180 individuals without type 2 diabetes at baseline who developed type 2 diabetes during the follow-up period of 11.5G3.0 years and in 372 controls frequency-matched for age, sex, and body mass index with normal glucose tolerance throughout the study. Results: MIC-1 concentrations at baseline were higher in cases (median (25/75th percentiles) 537.1 (452.7-677.4) pg/ml) than in controls (499.7 (413.8-615.4) pg/ml; PZ0.0044). In the age- and sex-adjusted model, a 1-S.D. increase in MIC-1 (206.0 pg/ml) was associated with an odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.21 (0.997; 1.46; PZ0.054) for type 2 diabetes. Adjustment for waist circumference, cardiovascular risk factors, socioeconomic status, proinflammatory mediators, and glycemia abolished the association. Conclusions: Baseline MIC-1 concentrations were increased, not decreased, in individuals before type 2 diabetes manifestation, but not independently associated with incident type 2 diabetes in multivariable analyses. This upregulation of MIC-1 could be part of an anti-inflammatory response preceding the onset of type 2 diabetes, which has been described before for interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and TGF-β1.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)913-917
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Endocrinology
Volume162
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2010

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Growth Differentiation Factor 15
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Transforming Growth Factors
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Waist Circumference
Social Class
Case-Control Studies
Weight Loss
Body Mass Index
Homeostasis
Up-Regulation
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 is increased in individuals before type 2 diabetes diagnosis but is not an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes : The Whitehall II study. / Carstensen, Maren; Herder, Christian; Brunner, Eric J.; Strassburger, Klaus; Tabák, A.; Roden, Michael; Rwitte, Daniel.

In: European Journal of Endocrinology, Vol. 162, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 913-917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Carstensen, Maren ; Herder, Christian ; Brunner, Eric J. ; Strassburger, Klaus ; Tabák, A. ; Roden, Michael ; Rwitte, Daniel. / Macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 is increased in individuals before type 2 diabetes diagnosis but is not an independent predictor of type 2 diabetes : The Whitehall II study. In: European Journal of Endocrinology. 2010 ; Vol. 162, No. 5. pp. 913-917.
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