Lung cancer and occupation in nonsmokers: A multicenter case-control study in Europe

Ariana Zeka, Andrea't Mannetje, David Zaridze, Neonila Szeszenia-Dabrowska, P. Rudnai, Jolanta Lissowska, Eleonóra Fabiánová, Dana Mates, Vladimir Bencko, Marie Navratilova, Adrian Cassidy, Vladimir Janout, Noemie Travier, Joelle Fevotte, Tony Fletcher, Paul Brennan, Paolo Boffetta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking is the main cause for lung cancer worldwide, making it difficult to examine the carcinogenic role of other risk factors because of possible confounding by smoking. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the association between lung cancer and occupation independent of smoking. METHODS: A case-control study of lung cancer was carried out between March 1998 and January 2002 in 16 centers from 7 European countries, including 223 never-smoking cases and 1039 controls. Information on lifestyle and occupation was obtained through detailed questionnaires. Job and industries were classified as entailing exposure to known or suspected carcinogens; in addition, expert assessment provided exposure estimates to specific agents. RESULTS: The odds ratio of lung cancer among women employed for more than 12 years in suspected high-risk occupations was 1.75 (95% confidence interval = 0.63-4.85). A comparable increase in risk was not detected for employment in established high-risk occupations or among men. Increased risk of lung cancer was suggested among individuals exposed to nonferrous metal dust and fumes, crystalline silica, and organic solvents. CONCLUSION: Occupations were found to play a limited role in lung cancer risk among never-smokers. Jobs entailing exposure to suspected lung carcinogens should receive priority in future studies among women. Nonferrous metal dust and fumes and silica may exert a carcinogenic effect independently from smoking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)615-623
Number of pages9
JournalEpidemiology
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006

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Occupations
Case-Control Studies
Lung Neoplasms
Smoking
Dust
Silicon Dioxide
Carcinogens
Metals
Life Style
Industry
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Lung

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Zeka, A., Mannetje, A., Zaridze, D., Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N., Rudnai, P., Lissowska, J., ... Boffetta, P. (2006). Lung cancer and occupation in nonsmokers: A multicenter case-control study in Europe. Epidemiology, 17(6), 615-623. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000239582.92495.b5

Lung cancer and occupation in nonsmokers : A multicenter case-control study in Europe. / Zeka, Ariana; Mannetje, Andrea't; Zaridze, David; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Rudnai, P.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Mates, Dana; Bencko, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Cassidy, Adrian; Janout, Vladimir; Travier, Noemie; Fevotte, Joelle; Fletcher, Tony; Brennan, Paul; Boffetta, Paolo.

In: Epidemiology, Vol. 17, No. 6, 11.2006, p. 615-623.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zeka, A, Mannetje, A, Zaridze, D, Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N, Rudnai, P, Lissowska, J, Fabiánová, E, Mates, D, Bencko, V, Navratilova, M, Cassidy, A, Janout, V, Travier, N, Fevotte, J, Fletcher, T, Brennan, P & Boffetta, P 2006, 'Lung cancer and occupation in nonsmokers: A multicenter case-control study in Europe', Epidemiology, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 615-623. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000239582.92495.b5
Zeka, Ariana ; Mannetje, Andrea't ; Zaridze, David ; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila ; Rudnai, P. ; Lissowska, Jolanta ; Fabiánová, Eleonóra ; Mates, Dana ; Bencko, Vladimir ; Navratilova, Marie ; Cassidy, Adrian ; Janout, Vladimir ; Travier, Noemie ; Fevotte, Joelle ; Fletcher, Tony ; Brennan, Paul ; Boffetta, Paolo. / Lung cancer and occupation in nonsmokers : A multicenter case-control study in Europe. In: Epidemiology. 2006 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 615-623.
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