Low-dimensional chaos in event-related brain potentials.

M. Molnár, J. E. Skinner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The quantification of a chaotic system, such as the nervous system, can be made by calculating the correlation dimension (D2) from a sample of the data it generates. The encephalogram was recorded from the vertex during an auditory "odd-ball" paradigm and was signal-averaged to reveal the event-related potentials (ERPs). A new method for continuously estimating D2, the "Point-D2" (PD2), was determined from the same data, and it also was signal-averaged. The PD2 method was found to be more accurate than others currently used for investigating finite data; it also was found to track nonstationarities that arise within the data. A significant (p <.001) PD2-decrease accompanied the ERPs evoked by target stimuli; the PD2 onset-latency and peak did not correlate with any ERPs. The very short latency suggests that the PD2-decrease may be associated with "selective stimulus set," an interpretation that has been related to early cortical ERP components.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-276
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume66
Issue number3-4
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1992

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Evoked Potentials
Brain
Nervous System

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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Low-dimensional chaos in event-related brain potentials. / Molnár, M.; Skinner, J. E.

In: International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 66, No. 3-4, 10.1992, p. 263-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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