Long-term results of subtotal colectomy for acquired hypertrophic megacolon in eight dogs: PAPER

T. Nemeth, N. Solymosi, G. Balka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To evaluate the long-term results of subtotal colectomy for acquired hypertrophic megacolon in the dog. Methods: Eight dogs with acquired hypertrophic megacolon underwent subtotal colectomy with preservation of the ileocolic junction. Long-term follow-up was obtained by clinical records and telephone interviews with the owners. Results: Eight large-breed dogs (age range: 6 to 12 years; mean age: 10·75 years) were enrolled. The use of bone meal, low levels of exercise, chronic constipation with dyschesia and tenesmus refractory to medical management were factors predisposing dogs to acquired hypertrophic megacolon. The diagnosis was confirmed in all animals by abdominal palpation, plain radiography and postoperative histopathological findings. There were no intraoperative complications. One dog died as a result of septic peritonitis. The clinical conditions (that is, resolution of obstipation and stool consistency) of the remaining seven dogs were improved at discharge; all animals returned to normal defecation in five to 10 weeks (mean: 7·3 weeks) and were alive 11 to 48 months (mean: 40·5 months) after surgery. Clinical Significance: Predominantly bony diet and/or low levels of physical activity may predispose dogs to acquired hypertrophic megacolon. Our results emphasise the long-term effectiveness of subtotal colectomy with preservation of the ileocolic junction in this condition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)618-624
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Small Animal Practice
Volume49
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

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megacolon
Megacolon
Colectomy
Dogs
dogs
bone meal
constipation
defecation
peritonitis
dog breeds
Defecation
radiography
Palpation
Intraoperative Complications
physical activity
Constipation
Peritonitis
interviews
animals
Radiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Small Animals

Cite this

Long-term results of subtotal colectomy for acquired hypertrophic megacolon in eight dogs : PAPER. / Nemeth, T.; Solymosi, N.; Balka, G.

In: Journal of Small Animal Practice, Vol. 49, No. 12, 12.2008, p. 618-624.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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