Long-term high-dose neuroleptic treatment: Who gets it and why?

M. I. Krakowski, M. Kunz, P. Czobor, J. Volavka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: High doses of neuroleptic medication are still administered to many patients, although many studies have shown the effectiveness of low- dose strategies. The purposes of the study were to determine whether and in what ways high-dose patients differed from patients on regular dosages and whether the higher dosages were more effective. Methods: In a case-control study at two large state hospitals, 38 high-dose patients were compared with 29 regular-dose patients. Results: The high-dose patients had a persistent course of illness, with severe chronic symptoms resulting in hospitalizations of much longer duration than those of the regular-dose patients. The high- dose patients evidenced more regressed functioning and were more violent. To control these behaviors, clinicians increased neuroleptic dosages. Conclusions: The high-dose patients represented a subgroup of chronic regressed and violent patients. Clinicians prescribed high dosages and continued to use them despite a lack of clear evidence that such treatment is effective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)640-644
Number of pages5
JournalHospital and Community Psychiatry
Volume44
Issue number7
Publication statusPublished - 1993

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Antipsychotic Agents
Therapeutics
State Hospitals
Behavior Control
Case-Control Studies
Hospitalization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Long-term high-dose neuroleptic treatment : Who gets it and why? / Krakowski, M. I.; Kunz, M.; Czobor, P.; Volavka, J.

In: Hospital and Community Psychiatry, Vol. 44, No. 7, 1993, p. 640-644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krakowski, MI, Kunz, M, Czobor, P & Volavka, J 1993, 'Long-term high-dose neuroleptic treatment: Who gets it and why?', Hospital and Community Psychiatry, vol. 44, no. 7, pp. 640-644.
Krakowski, M. I. ; Kunz, M. ; Czobor, P. ; Volavka, J. / Long-term high-dose neuroleptic treatment : Who gets it and why?. In: Hospital and Community Psychiatry. 1993 ; Vol. 44, No. 7. pp. 640-644.
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