Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus

É Szabó, G. Soltész, T. Decsi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) play an important role in the human body: they are incorporated into cell membranes and can influence the function of the membranes. N-3 LCPUFAs are precursors of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids, while the most important n-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid is precursor of proinflammatory prostaglandins, leucotriens and thromboxans. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by the disturbance of both carbohydrate and fatty acid homeostasis. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, significantly higher plasma linoleic acid and significantly lower plasma arachidonic acid values were reported than in the non-diabetic control animals. Because insulin is the most potent activator of both delta-6- and delta-5-desaturase enzymes, these alterations in fatty acid metabolism can be explained by the relative lack of insulin in type-1 diabetes mellitus. However, human studies are less unequivocal. Several authors found significantly higher linoleic acid values, while others did not find significant differences between type-1 diabetic patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, in the majority of the human studies values of arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were found to be significantly lower in diabetic patients than in healthy controls. In a study utilizing continuous subcutaneous insulin therapy, improved fatty acid supply in diabetic patients compared to patients receiving conventional insulin therapy was seen: linoleic acid values decreased, while values of the two most important long-chain polyunsaturated metabolites, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid increased. This observation raises the possibility that better diabetic control improves the activity of the delta-5- and delta-6-desaturase enzymes. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute disturbance of the carbohydrate homeostasis. In an experimental study, arachidonic acid values decreased significantly from baseline during ketosis, and returned to baseline values after recovery.Our research group investigated diabetic children during and after diabetic ketoacidosis. Comparison of plasma fatty acid profiles at clinical admission for diabetic ketoacidosis with those following the successful treatment showed significant decrease of linoleic acid significant increase of arachidonic acid values during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis. Chronic hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia can cause several micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Some of these complications may be related to disturbed fatty acid metabolism, the correction of which can contribute to the prevention of these complications. In fact, n-3 fatty acids may have a neuroprotective effect and they can have a positive impact on the composition of blood lipids: HDLcholesterol levels increased, while triacylglycerol levels decreased in many studies investigating the effect of n-3 fatty acid supplementation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages261-286
Number of pages26
ISBN (Print)9781607413110
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Fingerprint

Unsaturated Fatty Acids
Arachidonic Acid
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Diabetes Mellitus
Linoleic Acid
Fatty Acids
Insulin
Docosahexaenoic Acids
Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Linoleoyl-CoA Desaturase
Homeostasis
Carbohydrates
Ketosis
Eicosanoids
Neuroprotective Agents
Diabetes Complications
Enzymes
Streptozocin
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Human Body

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Szabó, É., Soltész, G., & Decsi, T. (2010). Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus. In Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment (pp. 261-286). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus. / Szabó, É; Soltész, G.; Decsi, T.

Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010. p. 261-286.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Szabó, É, Soltész, G & Decsi, T 2010, Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus. in Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 261-286.
Szabó É, Soltész G, Decsi T. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus. In Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2010. p. 261-286
Szabó, É ; Soltész, G. ; Decsi, T. / Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus. Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2010. pp. 261-286
@inbook{a23c2cc919be4b61a12f1b6b10618b39,
title = "Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus",
abstract = "Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) play an important role in the human body: they are incorporated into cell membranes and can influence the function of the membranes. N-3 LCPUFAs are precursors of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids, while the most important n-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid is precursor of proinflammatory prostaglandins, leucotriens and thromboxans. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by the disturbance of both carbohydrate and fatty acid homeostasis. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, significantly higher plasma linoleic acid and significantly lower plasma arachidonic acid values were reported than in the non-diabetic control animals. Because insulin is the most potent activator of both delta-6- and delta-5-desaturase enzymes, these alterations in fatty acid metabolism can be explained by the relative lack of insulin in type-1 diabetes mellitus. However, human studies are less unequivocal. Several authors found significantly higher linoleic acid values, while others did not find significant differences between type-1 diabetic patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, in the majority of the human studies values of arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were found to be significantly lower in diabetic patients than in healthy controls. In a study utilizing continuous subcutaneous insulin therapy, improved fatty acid supply in diabetic patients compared to patients receiving conventional insulin therapy was seen: linoleic acid values decreased, while values of the two most important long-chain polyunsaturated metabolites, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid increased. This observation raises the possibility that better diabetic control improves the activity of the delta-5- and delta-6-desaturase enzymes. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute disturbance of the carbohydrate homeostasis. In an experimental study, arachidonic acid values decreased significantly from baseline during ketosis, and returned to baseline values after recovery.Our research group investigated diabetic children during and after diabetic ketoacidosis. Comparison of plasma fatty acid profiles at clinical admission for diabetic ketoacidosis with those following the successful treatment showed significant decrease of linoleic acid significant increase of arachidonic acid values during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis. Chronic hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia can cause several micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Some of these complications may be related to disturbed fatty acid metabolism, the correction of which can contribute to the prevention of these complications. In fact, n-3 fatty acids may have a neuroprotective effect and they can have a positive impact on the composition of blood lipids: HDLcholesterol levels increased, while triacylglycerol levels decreased in many studies investigating the effect of n-3 fatty acid supplementation.",
author = "{\'E} Szab{\'o} and G. Solt{\'e}sz and T. Decsi",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781607413110",
pages = "261--286",
booktitle = "Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment",
publisher = "Nova Science Publishers, Inc.",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid supply in diabetes mellitus

AU - Szabó, É

AU - Soltész, G.

AU - Decsi, T.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) play an important role in the human body: they are incorporated into cell membranes and can influence the function of the membranes. N-3 LCPUFAs are precursors of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids, while the most important n-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid is precursor of proinflammatory prostaglandins, leucotriens and thromboxans. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by the disturbance of both carbohydrate and fatty acid homeostasis. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, significantly higher plasma linoleic acid and significantly lower plasma arachidonic acid values were reported than in the non-diabetic control animals. Because insulin is the most potent activator of both delta-6- and delta-5-desaturase enzymes, these alterations in fatty acid metabolism can be explained by the relative lack of insulin in type-1 diabetes mellitus. However, human studies are less unequivocal. Several authors found significantly higher linoleic acid values, while others did not find significant differences between type-1 diabetic patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, in the majority of the human studies values of arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were found to be significantly lower in diabetic patients than in healthy controls. In a study utilizing continuous subcutaneous insulin therapy, improved fatty acid supply in diabetic patients compared to patients receiving conventional insulin therapy was seen: linoleic acid values decreased, while values of the two most important long-chain polyunsaturated metabolites, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid increased. This observation raises the possibility that better diabetic control improves the activity of the delta-5- and delta-6-desaturase enzymes. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute disturbance of the carbohydrate homeostasis. In an experimental study, arachidonic acid values decreased significantly from baseline during ketosis, and returned to baseline values after recovery.Our research group investigated diabetic children during and after diabetic ketoacidosis. Comparison of plasma fatty acid profiles at clinical admission for diabetic ketoacidosis with those following the successful treatment showed significant decrease of linoleic acid significant increase of arachidonic acid values during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis. Chronic hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia can cause several micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Some of these complications may be related to disturbed fatty acid metabolism, the correction of which can contribute to the prevention of these complications. In fact, n-3 fatty acids may have a neuroprotective effect and they can have a positive impact on the composition of blood lipids: HDLcholesterol levels increased, while triacylglycerol levels decreased in many studies investigating the effect of n-3 fatty acid supplementation.

AB - Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) play an important role in the human body: they are incorporated into cell membranes and can influence the function of the membranes. N-3 LCPUFAs are precursors of anti-inflammatory eicosanoids, while the most important n-6 LCPUFA, arachidonic acid is precursor of proinflammatory prostaglandins, leucotriens and thromboxans. Diabetes mellitus is characterized by the disturbance of both carbohydrate and fatty acid homeostasis. In streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, significantly higher plasma linoleic acid and significantly lower plasma arachidonic acid values were reported than in the non-diabetic control animals. Because insulin is the most potent activator of both delta-6- and delta-5-desaturase enzymes, these alterations in fatty acid metabolism can be explained by the relative lack of insulin in type-1 diabetes mellitus. However, human studies are less unequivocal. Several authors found significantly higher linoleic acid values, while others did not find significant differences between type-1 diabetic patients and healthy controls. Nevertheless, in the majority of the human studies values of arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid were found to be significantly lower in diabetic patients than in healthy controls. In a study utilizing continuous subcutaneous insulin therapy, improved fatty acid supply in diabetic patients compared to patients receiving conventional insulin therapy was seen: linoleic acid values decreased, while values of the two most important long-chain polyunsaturated metabolites, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid increased. This observation raises the possibility that better diabetic control improves the activity of the delta-5- and delta-6-desaturase enzymes. Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute disturbance of the carbohydrate homeostasis. In an experimental study, arachidonic acid values decreased significantly from baseline during ketosis, and returned to baseline values after recovery.Our research group investigated diabetic children during and after diabetic ketoacidosis. Comparison of plasma fatty acid profiles at clinical admission for diabetic ketoacidosis with those following the successful treatment showed significant decrease of linoleic acid significant increase of arachidonic acid values during recovery from diabetic ketoacidosis. Chronic hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia can cause several micro- and macrovascular complications in diabetic patients. Some of these complications may be related to disturbed fatty acid metabolism, the correction of which can contribute to the prevention of these complications. In fact, n-3 fatty acids may have a neuroprotective effect and they can have a positive impact on the composition of blood lipids: HDLcholesterol levels increased, while triacylglycerol levels decreased in many studies investigating the effect of n-3 fatty acid supplementation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896195884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896195884&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84896195884

SN - 9781607413110

SP - 261

EP - 286

BT - Handbook of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

PB - Nova Science Publishers, Inc.

ER -